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Sep 16

Everyone, well almost everyone, has a phone as an appendage these days, so when inspiration strikes they can jot a note in their phone or send themself an email.

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Sep 16

I would imagine that students that may not have been all that excited when writing with pen and paper, might actually have fun with it using the tools of the modern age!

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Sep 16

This line has struck me as odd in many forms. Not because of the power it is trying to hold, but because it strikes me as odd that she has never gazed upon herself. I understand that looking in a mirror was not a common activity, but i have memories of gazing at my arms as I was walking, or watching my legs as I ran. It seems strange that someone could’ve not looked at themselves at all until the age of six.

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Sep 16

This line has two parts, dawn, but also doom. Dawn representing the rising moments of her life, moments meant to be savored and cherished. The doom was meant to represent her anguish, the pain she felt through her every day life that is later exposed. All of this is told to the reader in the previous line, explaining it in vague metaphor as well.

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Sep 16

This moment is meant purely to make the reader wonder. It gives the reader answers to questions they didn’t know they were supposed to ask, in turn just leaving the reader with more questions.

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Sep 16

This is the start of the story, the tone setter. By saying “their eyes flung wide open in judgement,” the author is setting a serious tone, hinting at anguish for the reader in the future. It is a form of foreshadowing that happens to be less foreshadowing, and more just downright telling you what is going to happen. It’s a dance around the inevitable.

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Sep 16

Erica, I like your proposed language much better than the original text. I agree, students can be asked to help create space for empathy; that’s something we can all do. Thank you.

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Sep 16

Could “providing healing” be akin to creating space for empathy? And out of that can come movement from damage to health?

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Sep 15

I don’t believe he is sayin that his nephews parents were in the streets. He is talking about the “looking about the streets” meaning, what the world has to offer him. He is saying that his nephew was made out of love but that the world he has been brought into is unkind and loveless. This is based purely from racial constructs and a belief in white superiority and black inferiority.

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Sep 15

I think I understand what this is getting at. Maybe it’s just the wording. I think our education system/administrators/teachers needs to offer space in the curriculum for images and narratives from marginalized communities -which could be healing-but I don’t think that “learners” should be expected to “provide healing for damage” that’s been done to their communities. Anyone read this differently?

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Sep 15

Seems a bit ironic, but I found this particular document to be pretty jargon-y. The ideas are solid, but the language is pretty clunky. I would say it’s not accessible to a reader not already steeped in edu-lingo.

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Sep 15

This line raises an issue for me. I believe it’s really important for “learners to produce [counter] narratives….that represent the fullness of their identities or life complexities.” What I worry about is a growing tendency in some corners of academia to silence narratives [“misguided texts”] we disagree with, rather than engaging them in dialogue, debate and analysis.

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Sep 15

I read texts where people are talking about Boomers, Millennials and other generational groups in ways that are not constructive. Making a mid-life career shift myself, I am keenly aware of negative attitudes toward mature workers.

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Sep 15

In my prior career, I looked for ways to facilitate peer to peer learning and team problem solving approaches. I found that facilitation was often necessary for group collaboration to be successful.

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Sep 15

I’ve never heard this term before. Sounds like a food desert, but for information.

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Sep 15

Our county created its own taxing entity, in order to better fund libraries. During the pandemic when libraries were closed except for book pick up, a lot of people were unable to access resources, especially digital tools.

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Sep 15

Your grandparents are great role models. I, too, hope to keep learning, right up until the end.

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Sep 15

I like these specific terms of content consumers, curators, and creators—along with the understanding that learners must flow back and forth through all three phases, as in a continuous tide of learning.

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Sep 15

I always admired my grandparents (who were educators) for being life-long learners. They continuously learned new subjects and new technical tools, even when in their eighties. As I age, I want to maintain an attitude of connecting with the world and young people where they are rather than expecting a stoppage at some randomly selected time of my living.

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Sep 15

I can’t pull out just a few of these points because they are very interconnected and all important. Especially when certain forces are trying to limit equitable access, cross-cultural connections, and ethical implications, we must continue to educate, educate, educate.

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Sep 15

The acknowledgement of interconnectivity, dynamism, and malleability is so important. As people today argue about changing/updating thought practices, I wonder how anyone could be ok with changes in history but not changes today. If there’s one constant in the human condition, it is change.

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Sep 15

<embed width=512 height=330 src=“https://www.c-span.org/video/standalone/?514546-1/gymnasts-fbi-director-testify-larry-nassar-sexual-assault-investigation” allowfullscreen=‘allowfullscreen’ frameborder=0>

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Sep 15

I feel like this is an area where I am a total beginner. I’ve spent a lot more time thinking about content than medium. Is this something one only learns through practice, or are there toolkits or 101s available to help prevent design bellyflops?

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Sep 15

This is one of the problems of social media as a primary source of information; artificial intelligence feeds us more of the same, rather than offering a variety of sources and viewpoints to consider. It’s important to always ask: what is the source of this information and what is the perspective or bias of that source?

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Sep 15

This is a big one, in the post- factual age we seem to be living in. I remember in high school being assigned to read news articles and fact check them, as a way to learn this skill.

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Sep 15

I definitely want to create a learning environment that allows risk taking. You’ll see from my Make this week, I’m trying to model (modest) risk taking by using my own writing as a mentor text, and presenting my revision process “live,” rather than just the polished final product. I’m curious: how do my classmates create an environment that fosters risk taking in writing?

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Sep 15

This sentence made me laugh. Yes, I want my students to be critical and savvy, but I have to get there myself, first.

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Sep 15

As someone who speaks more than one language, I think it’s really important to create a welcoming space not just students who speak different languages, but also variations like dialect and jargon. I think code switching, the ability to choose a style of speech to suit one’s situation and audience, is an important skill to cultivate. Writing assignments should teach formal, academic language, and also allow room for informal language, languages other than English, that reflect students’ real lives and experiences.

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Sep 15

During the pandemic, we all watched how students across the country without access to hardware, software or reliable internet service, had to rely on schools and libraries to fill those gaps. I was struck by images of students outside McDonalds to catch wifi, or in their bathroom in order to use the single device in their household to attend a zoom class without interruption….the digital divide is real. The pandemic revealed how much still needs to be done to address it.

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Sep 15

This simple line made me think of the Korean alphabet, hangul, invented in 1446. Previously, literate Koreans had relied on Chinese characters, using the Chinese meanings and Korean pronunciation. The invention of a vernacular alphabet expanded literacy outside the scholar class, to all men, and to women. This new technology, a written alphabet that was accessible to all, led to significant improvements in literacy and other societal changes.

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Sep 15

we need to be carful with our socials passwords and any thing that is imporatn cause u never know if someone else knows your own personal privacy information

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Sep 15

Cause priavcy is a word for a reason we needd that priavcy the goverment wouldnt like if we would want to see their privacy information

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Sep 15

I feel if kids get more sleep the more energy they get to come to school with energy.

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Sep 15

yeah i agree with her cause they need to stop they are the goverment not people who steal information

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