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EDU 807 - Week 1 Video - Blended Learning Energizes High School Math Students - Summer 2018 - Group 2

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Jan 1
Troy Hicks (Jan 01 2018 6:59PM) : Viewing Task for "Blended Learning Energizes High School Math Students" more

Please create an initial, substantive response to each of the three viewing tasks below. (3 total)

Then, offer a thoughtful response to at least three different classmates. (3 total)

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Jan 1
Troy Hicks (Jan 01 2018 6:53PM) : Task 1: What does this use of technology assume? more

One of my favorite pair of questions that you will encounter over and over again this semester are this:
What does this use of technology assume about students and learning? What does this use of technology assume about teachers and teaching?

At this point in the video, how would you reply to those two questions? What does this particular use of Khan Academy assume about students and the ways that they learn? What does it assume about teachers and the way that they teach?

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Apr 30
Susan Byers (Apr 30 2018 4:21PM) : Khan Academy technology assumes students are willing to engage with technology and be self-driven. It assumes that teachers are willing to somewhat surrender instruction to the program. more

I’ve used Khan Academy for various math concepts, but I didn’t notice that it was aligned to any particular textbook. I assume that Khan aligns to the basic content that most math textbooks would cover. How does Mr. McIntosh from the video make sure his content for the day is what Khan will cover? And are the hints new? I do not recall that option.

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May 6
Mr. John Golden (May 06 2018 7:21PM) : Susan, As I reflect on your argument, I, too, believe that the instructor in the Khan video is relying too much on technology. For instance, if we reflect on Dr. Deschryver’s course, EDU 800, we learned about TPACK. more

With TPACK, it is not enough to rely on just technology. Specifically, we need technology knowledge, pedagogy knowledge and content knowledge. I think one of these variables is missing in the Khan video.

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May 6
Michelle Claypool (May 06 2018 8:03PM) : Surrendering instruction more

Susan,
I agree that the use of Khan academy kind of assumes that teachers are willing to surrender their classroom to technology teaching. The teacher would have to have the desire to teach their class this way and the students would have to be receptive of it or it would not work.

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May 6
Rebekah Redmer (May 06 2018 9:34PM) : Alignment more

Good question Susan! In working with high school students, Khan Academy is integrated with their College Board account and used significantly for SAT prep. Although it is not a text book, Khan Academy highlights for students specific math concepts to improve upon prior to taking the SAT.

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May 8
Troy Hicks (May 08 2018 6:12PM) : Raising some significant concerns about teacher autonomy, scripted curriculum, and the culture of assessment… more

… Thanks all for you for looking at this through critical lens, raising significant questions about when, how, and why the use of an educational technology such as Khan Academy is brought to the classroom.

I, too, often think about the ways in which the technology is actually pushing students to be more critical or creative, as compared to simply consuming material. In this case, it seems like a lot of consumption, and not much criticality or creativity.

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May 6
Michelle Claypool (May 06 2018 8:01PM) : Assumption more

I think that this use of technology assumes that the students actually want to learn and use it. A vast majority of kids today are very proficient with the use of technology, however there still are those students out there that do not want to use it.
I think that the use assumes that the students will get right to work and be motivated to succeed at their course. It, also, assumes that multiple students will not be “stuck” all at the same time and need his help. That can be demotivating for the students if they have to continually wait for the instructor to help them.

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May 6
Rebekah Redmer (May 06 2018 9:31PM) : Technology Assumptions more

The use of Kahn Academy in the math class assumes the students are motivated to use this technology, and self-directed to follow the “3 opportunities” provided when challenged. It implies this learning style and use of technology is appropriate for this group of students, who may have been exposed to these math concepts prior yet did not successfully complete or earn credit.

As for teachers, the technology and structure can be assumed there was adequate training in not only using Kahn Academy, but also technology support, progress monitoring and student support. The former principal mentioned this type of learning lab, “changes the dynamic” of instruction, which is an adjustment for teachers who have not been in a 1:1 non-traditional setting.

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Jan 1
Troy Hicks (Jan 01 2018 6:57PM) : Task 2: What does this use of technology assume? (Pt 2) more

Again, at this point in the video, how would you reply to those two questions?

What does this particular use of Khan Academy assume about students and the ways that they learn?

What does it assume about teachers and the way that they teach?

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Apr 30
Susan Byers (Apr 30 2018 4:25PM) : The Khan program assumes that students will engage more when they have control of their learning. Teachers will accept this technological intervention when they see higher test scores and more student engagement. Everyone wins. more

The immediacy and individuality foster engagement. The mode of a computer screen, a video with explanations in steps, and hints offer a sense of modern learning, plus scaffolding for students who may struggle.

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May 3
Troy Hicks (May 03 2018 6:49AM) : An assumption about motivation more

Thanks, Susan, for making this point. I agree, this is a fairly important assumption about the way that Khan (and similar programs) function.

As you consider what you learned with Dr. Francis in the motivation class — as well as what you have seen in your own experiences — do you think, ultimately, that this will help students become independent and curious learners? Or, alternatively, does it foster a kind of dependency? Curious to hear more of your thoughts here…

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May 7
Susan Byers (May 07 2018 1:05PM) : For younger students, the dependency would be understandable and probably acceptable. For older students, this is not true. more

Older students come to realize that learning on their own volition is tremendously rewarding. The “fun” of technology is enjoyable, but not necessary. Therefore, I do not predict any real dependency on programs such as Khan Academy.

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May 8
Troy Hicks (May 08 2018 6:15PM) : Thanks for sharing your additional thoughts... more

… I’m no expert on motivation, either from a psychological perspective broadly, or with my own children! One of the things that does concern me, especially for adolescents, is that it seems as though many technologies introduced in schools – like Khan Academy – still relies heavily on extrinsic rewards and doesn’t necessarily help them “come to realize that learning on their own volition is tremendously rewarding.” This, in turn, leads us to have the types of high school graduation rates/dropout factories that exists in our country.

At any rate, I don’t have an answer, and I appreciate that you are willing to engage in the question. Maybe we’ll figure some element of this out together over the next semester of 807!

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May 6
Michelle Claypool (May 06 2018 8:08PM) : Learning more

Susan,
I think this is a great way for students to learn. My kids have used Khan academy for years now in school and they love it. Allowing the students control of their own learning gives them a sense of self, I think. My youngest son’s science class is like this. As soon as the students finish all of their online lectures and quizzes they are finished for the semester. He allows them to work at their own pace and parents have opportunities to check on their students progress to ensure they are on pace. There is still 4 weeks left of the semester and he is finished for that class. It motivates some students to get through it and pushes them to succeed.

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May 8
Troy Hicks (May 08 2018 6:17PM) : Thanks for sharing your son's experience more

Thanks, Michelle, for telling this story about your son. It is good to know that this approach works for some students, and with a great deal of success.

I think one of the challenges, for educators on the whole, is trying to figure out what variables we can tweak and change to offer students enough of a personalized experience while still working to move forward together as a class in a thoughtful, sustained manner.

While these technologies do allow for personalization, I wonder if students are getting the deep, meaningful type of understanding of mathematics, literature, history, science, and other subjects when moving through it quickly and at their own pace…

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May 6
Michelle Claypool (May 06 2018 8:05PM) : Task 2 more

I think at this point the technology assumes that the students will organize their thoughts and complete the steps. They can be more independent with their learning. They do not need to wait on the teacher to advance to the next level, they can move at their own pace and be self-guiding with their learning.

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May 6
Rebekah Redmer (May 06 2018 9:53PM) : Independent more

Michelle,

I agree, there can be an assumption of independence when using a program like Khan. The teacher training and support to guide students towards that independence is important, especially as that “coach” for kids.

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May 6
Rebekah Redmer (May 06 2018 9:49PM) : Technology Assumptions (pt 2) more

It was shared that student engagement with the Khan program was a difficult in the beginning and easy for students to “get lost”, wanting immediate assistance when stuck. Over time, through procedural structure (in my head I think of Harry Wong) a new academic behavior was shaping; the external motivation presented by the staff may have transferred to internal motivation of the student to push through.

Students in this program may be specific learners who are productively persisting in the program, with an end-goal of completing. There is a tremendous amount of instant feedback required for students to independently continue, and the technology alleviates constant access to the teacher, as well as allowing for self-monitoring progress.

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May 8
Troy Hicks (May 08 2018 6:18PM) : The First (and Many) Days of School more

Thanks, Rebekah, for sharing your thoughts on structures and procedures related to the use of educational technology. I agree, and your Harry Wong reference brings back lots of memories for me, too. We need to think about how we can set up procedures and protocols for using technology that make the experience meaningful and useful.

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Jan 1
Troy Hicks (Jan 01 2018 6:56PM) : Task 3: Finally, connect to Cuban more

Reflect on the video and make a connection to one of the “visions” that Cuban offers. What does this vision of educational technology (using Khan Academy) represent? Make a brief argument about which vision this use of technology represents.

Technophile: “The technophile’s vision of such schools is anchored in making teaching and learning far more productive and meaningful than both are now.”

OR

Preservationist: “The vision buried within the preservationist’s story is one of schools’ continuing to do for society what they have historically done: pass on prevailing values and accumulated knowledge to the next generation, improve ways of teaching and learning the prescribed curriculum, sort out those children who achieve academically from those who do not, and give taxpayers as efficient a schooling as can be bought with available funds.”

OR

Cautious Optimist: “… cautious optimists acknowledge the power of organizational structures and cultural beliefs to shape routine school and classroom practices but see these beliefs and structures changing slowly. They believe that putting computers into classrooms will yield a steady but very slow movement toward fundamental changes in teaching and schooling.”

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Apr 30
Susan Byers (Apr 30 2018 4:33PM) : Cautious Optimist: It has already been 30 years since computers were available to revolutionize the classroom. The changes are indeed slow but steady. more
What helps to change the use of technology in school is research, available of technology, and a younger generation of teachers who have grown up with technology. Because new affordances are always being realized and/or developed, technology will continue to change education. Maybe the pace will increase. Maybe it doesn’t need to. We need to advance for the right reasons and in the right way. Research helps with that.
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May 6
Michelle Claypool (May 06 2018 8:13PM) : Research more

I do think that research is going to help with the advancement of technology in the classroom. The more research that is done on the benefits or non-benefits of using it in the classroom, the more educators will be able to understand how to efficiently use it and what they should be using it for exactly. More and more research is being done on a daily basis.

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May 6
Rebekah Redmer (May 06 2018 10:10PM) : Research helps more

Susan,

I agree, research will help with the direction. We are indeed working with a very different learner K-12, and technology is a part of how they simply function. To keep students engaged and motivated, they expect tech-based learning, in fact many parents now interview school leaders as they shop schools and technology is a top expectation (with safety #1). I hope research can catch up :)

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May 6
Michelle Claypool (May 06 2018 8:11PM) : Cautious Optimist more

I think that the cautious optimist scenario really applies here. Teachers are slowly trying to integrate more technology into the classroom and push students to use it daily. My school is very rural and half the students, at least, do not have computers or internet at home. The school supplies computers during class, which allows all students to stay on pace with technology and learning.

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May 6
Rebekah Redmer (May 06 2018 10:04PM) : Cautious Optimist more

I would lean towards Cautious Optimist in relation to the video. This programmatic approach regarding math is delivered through technology as the basis of instruction, but within a traditional classroom setting. This innovative approach to learning or re-learning mathematical concepts also provides students with skills evident through problem solving. This is still slow change (compared to the rapid pace of technology and online learning), but change nonetheless.

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Educator Peter McIntosh helps his students to take ownership of their learning by using interactive subject-mastery tools like Khan Academy. For more articles and videos about integrating technology in the classroom, visit our Tech2Learn resource page.

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DMU Timestamp: January 02, 2017 19:32

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