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EDU 807 Summer 2018 - Week 4 - Interview with Megan Erickson - Group 3

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In this episode of the Majority Report, Megan Erickson critiques a variety of ideas that are popular in current conversations related to educational technology. I have tried to mark a few spots in the video related to different topics, and I invite you to discuss these ideas -- in light of what you just read in the ISTE standards.

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As you listen, consider what the conceptions of students (and what technology/standards) can do with/for/to students? Who benefits? Who is left behind? What is the actual purpose for using the technology?

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As you read, make connections between Erickson's argument about how and why students should use technology and compare them to the ISTE Standards.

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What types of changes outlined in the standards appear to be easy to make? Which changes will be more difficult? Why?

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For instance, at at about 1:50, she talks about "student-centered" and "personalized" techniques and then deconstructs that argument. This reminds me of ISTE standard for students 5c, which suggests that students "Demonstrate personal responsibility for lifelong learning." At this point in the video, then, I would want to offer some connection between Erickson and ISTE, pointing out the fact that -- while ISTE may have good intentions to help students become self-motivated and independent, Erickson notes that this is an unrealistic expectation fueled by a technocratic vision of education. What, in the ed tech industry's eyes, does it mean to be "personalized?" Is personalized learning in all students' best interests? Etc...

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Please offer three initial comments, as well as three replies to your classmates' comments.

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Jan 20
Troy Hicks (Jan 20 2017 12:38PM) : Personalized Learning more

In this segment, she talks about “personalized learning,” making connections to Skinner and Kahn Academy.

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May 24
Mr. John Golden (May 24 2018 8:53AM) : I have to disagree with Megan on some of her key points. From my gathering, she is not a fan of the Bill Gates educational reform and movement. [Edited] more Tags: #edu807

Overall, her view point, in my opinion, supports upper middle class and higher class school districts. That is, she states that design thinking is baseless and it offers no substance. On the contrary, design thinking and personalized learning may be the only option for school districts in the lower class school districts. Moreover, the Bill Gates Foundation highly supports lower class school districts. Thus, educational technology opens the door for design thinking and personalized learning in lower class school districts. My point is that lower order thinking, as an option, leads to higher order thinking and personalized learning in disadvantaged school districts.

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May 27
MICHAEL WHITE (May 27 2018 10:43PM) : Personalized learning more

Mr. John,
I concur that Ms. Megan may not be a fan of Bill Gates or education reform at all. She mentioned that this design is baseless and not worthy of student attention.

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May 27
MICHAEL WHITE (May 27 2018 10:37PM) : Personalized Learning more

The personalized learning using technology is the most likely way that the education system will have reform. We need to have learners prepare for the knowledge worker jobs of the future and that may be by personalized learning.

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Troy Hicks (Jan 20 2017 12:40PM) : Management more

In this segment, she talks about “management.”

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Mr. John Golden (May 24 2018 10:13AM) : Megan comments on the Skinner and Peter Drucker style management in the turn of the 20th Century. She notes that this was the era of mechanization and machinery. Finally, She notes that those men had little interest in the classroom environment. [Edited] more

Again, I have to disagree with Megan, as such, mechanization or machinery had much to do with the classroom environment. That is, there was a big push for total quality management (TQM) in the turn of the 20th Century. TQM relates to science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) curriculars. Also, TQM was very much related to the movement of establishing more STEM related programs in the K12 environment in the turn and ending of the 20th Century. In fact, back in 1985, Bill Gates warned us about the lack of STEM graduates in the US in comparison to China and India. To date, commenting on Bill Gate’s warning, the majority of the highly skilled technologists in the global workforce are from China or India, for example. So, I argue that machinery and mechanization was very much related to the classroom environment in the turn and ending of the 20th century, especially in terms of STEM.

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May 27
MICHAEL WHITE (May 27 2018 10:56PM) : Management more

Mr. John,
We know that STEM and STEAM are majors areas of opportunity for us. Especially in this day and age where the jobs of tomorrow need to be reflected in the learning of today’s classroom.

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May 27
MICHAEL WHITE (May 27 2018 10:50PM) : Management more

Ms. Megan looks from a personal perspective instead of a time period perspective. We were in a industrial revolution time period when it was machines and assembly lines. You teach what you are as Dr, Mirsha said. The time period was to get people prepared for management and labor. Now it is time to get students prepared for knowledge worker jobs and technology is that road.

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Jan 20
Troy Hicks (Jan 20 2017 12:41PM) : Charter Schools more

In this segment, she talks about “charter schools.”

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May 24
Mr. John Golden (May 24 2018 11:02AM) : I think that Megan has no clue about the status or living conditions of disadvantaged K12 children who live in disadvantaged school districts. [Edited] more

Megan argues that designed and personalized learning are no substitution for the traditional classroom environment. As a result, Megan fails to realize that the well off school districts possess the wherewithal to use educational technology and traditional classroom environments, at the same time, to explore and teach critical thinking skills. As such, without the support of philanthropists such as Bill Gates, and the INOVA founder, K12 students from poorer school districts are taught, for the most part, from only text books with minimal to no intervention of educational technology. Thus, in my opinion, it is a good cause that billionaires or philanthropists invest in educational technology across the board.

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May 27
MICHAEL WHITE (May 27 2018 11:08PM) : Charter Schools more

Charter Schools were designed as an alternative to public schools that were not able to educate students properly. As far as them being money making businesses, would put that in the same boat as school to prison pipelines. The art of making money off of students misfortune. Khan academy has been quite successful and Ms, Megan referred to it as a glorified text book. I am not sure that I can agree with that especially when it helps so many disadvantaged and undeserved students.

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Troy Hicks (Jan 20 2017 12:43PM) : Income and SES more

In this segment, she talks about “income and SES.”

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May 24
Mr. John Golden (May 24 2018 11:38AM) : Megan stumbles on this this segment of the interview. Her response is from the lens of the majority and, in my opinion, she has no clue about the struggles of the minority in terms of fair and equitable educational opportunities. more

Current issues in education are surrounded by income and SES. For example, issues from family choice in education to financing education are, for the most part, based on income and SES. That said, educational technology leverages learning in the classroom environment. Educational technology, moreover, enables learning through multiple avenues of medium. In contrast, Megan argues that educational technology and medium do not cause deeper learning. She uses research to back up her claim. Thus, I disagree with her argument and premise. That is, educational technology does cause deeper learning when it accompanies pedagogy knowledge and content knowledge.

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May 27
MICHAEL WHITE (May 27 2018 11:16PM) : Income and SES more

I can agree that schools teach to the test. That is a true statement. As for allowing technology to be 1×1 for students, the students know how to use the iPads better than most teachers. LA has one of the largest school districts and one of the overall poorest districts for tools and resources.

This is where we have to look at the ISTE’s again and teachers have to step up to the plate and include information technology in their pedagogy. You cannot blame the students for getting technology in their hands and the school not able to capitalize on the initiative.

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Troy Hicks (Jan 20 2017 12:44PM) : Classroom Design more

In this segment, she talks about “classroom design.”

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May 24
Mr. John Golden (May 24 2018 11:53AM) : Megan, again, speaks from the lens of educational technology as the only source of learning. That is, educational technology is mostly used in a hybrid formation and it does not stand alone. [Edited] more

In a hybrid formation, learning and collaborating skills are happening. From my understanding, Megan speaks about students staring at a computer screen and, at the same time, having no interaction or collaboration with the teacher or other students. If that is the case, then no learning is taking place. That sort of learning needs to be integrated with TPACK.

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May 27
MICHAEL WHITE (May 27 2018 11:23PM) : Classroom Design more

SO that is a design issue. Again I have to fallback on the ISTE standards. It is the responsibility of the teacher to incorporate curriculum based on the needs of the student. It indeed should be student-centered learning. Their should be asynchronous and synchronous chatting going on and the sharing of ideas.

I can conclude that Ms. Megan is completely against innovation in the classroom and wants to keep a jukebox in front of a class full of ipods. T His combination will never work. The philosophy must change and in this age of disruption, Ms. Megan will have to see this wave of technology that is here and transition for the good of the learner.

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Troy Hicks (Jan 20 2017 12:46PM) : Curriculum Reform more

In this segment, she talks about “curriculum reform.”

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May 24
Mr. John Golden (May 24 2018 12:07PM) : I agree with Megan in that curriculum reform is a slow process. Any type of national curriculum change requires legislation and Congressional action. more

The last major change in education was the No Child Left Behind Act. This Act was not a paradigm shift, but it was a ways and means to make education affordable for all US children. The Act also ensured that all US children received a fair and equitable education. In terms of educational technology, it is a game changer that will change the way education is learned and taught in the future. It is a matter of time before we see major enforcement in using educational technology in the classroom environment.

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May 27
MICHAEL WHITE (May 27 2018 11:28PM) : Curriculum Reform more

Who is the reformer and where is the strength in numbers, If there is an opportunity to do whats right and make technology work. We need good teachers to except the fact that change is inevitable. Learners need the tools to move forward. I think Ms. Megan may need to look at the educational system from a societal perspective and not a monolithic lens to an audience of one.

DMU Timestamp: January 02, 2017 19:32

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