NowComment
2-Pane Combined
Comments:
Full Summaries Sorted

"One Art," by Elizabeth Bishop

Author: Elizabeth Bishop

0 General Document comments
0 Sentence and Paragraph comments
0 Image and Video comments


The art of losing isn’t hard to master;
so many things seem filled with the intent
to be lost that their loss is no disaster.

New Conversation
Paragraph 1 0
No paragraph-level conversations. Start one.
New Conversation
Paragraph 1, Sentence 1 0
profile_photo
May 28
OLIVER LANG (May 28 2019 1:53PM) : this may be saying that the author feels like a death isn't something you should really care about or take time on
New Conversation
Paragraph 1, Sentence 2 0
profile_photo
May 20
JULISSA ARROYO (May 20 2019 11:40AM) : Why in this sentence is it saying that there are many things that have the potential to be lost that losing them would be no disaster, if she was trying to explain that you can get over these losses even if they were really important?
New Conversation
Paragraph 1, Sentence 3 0
profile_photo
Apr 8
JULISSA ARROYO (Apr 08 2019 11:47AM) : No matter what you lose or let go of, it won't be the end of anything you stand for. more

This means that in the art of losing, to the reader it says, no matter what you do or what happens, it’s not going to be a disaster.

profile_photo
May 16
ETHAN PEREZ (May 16 2019 1:49PM) : I disagree bk to me it says that so many things are filled with disaster and the intent to be lost that their really is no "disaster" anymore

Lose something every day. Accept the fluster
of lost door keys, the hour badly spent.
The art of losing isn’t hard to master.

New Conversation
Paragraph 2 0
No paragraph-level conversations. Start one.
New Conversation
Paragraph 2, Sentence 1 0
No sentence-level conversations. Start one.
New Conversation
Paragraph 2, Sentence 2 0
profile_photo
Apr 8
JULISSA ARROYO (Apr 08 2019 11:55AM) : This verse to me is saying that Elizabeth used to lose something all the time or at least occasionally, and that she would get over it and move on. So she's telling her readers that when you lost something, not to worry, you'll be fine. Just accept it.
New Conversation
Paragraph 2, Sentence 3 0
No sentence-level conversations. Start one.
New Conversation
Paragraph 0
No paragraph-level conversations. Start one.
New Conversation
Paragraph 2, Sentence 5 0
No sentence-level conversations. Start one.

Then practice losing farther, losing faster:
places, and names, and where it was you meant
to travel. None of these will bring disaster.

New Conversation
Paragraph 3 0
No paragraph-level conversations. Start one.
New Conversation
Paragraph 3, Sentence 1 0
No sentence-level conversations. Start one.
New Conversation
Paragraph 3, Sentence 2 0
profile_photo
Apr 8
JULISSA ARROYO (Apr 08 2019 12:00PM) : In this sentence she is giving an example of her forgetting where she's been and people she has met. And yet that occurring, she hasn't really been fazed by it.
profile_photo
May 16
ETHAN PEREZ (May 16 2019 2:15PM) : Because it won't bring disaster, and as I said before, this possibly may have already happened to lots of other people to the point where it doesn't really bring "disaster" anymore.
profile_photo
May 20
JULISSA ARROYO (May 20 2019 11:48AM) : What does she mean by, "and where it was you meant to travel"? How can you forget about a place you once thought about going to?
New Conversation
Paragraph 3, Sentence 3 0
No sentence-level conversations. Start one.
New Conversation
Paragraph 3, Sentence 4 0
No sentence-level conversations. Start one.

I lost my mother’s watch. And look! my last, or
next-to-last, of three loved houses went.
The art of losing isn’t hard to master.

New Conversation
Paragraph 4 0
No paragraph-level conversations. Start one.
New Conversation
Paragraph 4, Sentence 1 0
No sentence-level conversations. Start one.
New Conversation
Paragraph 4, Sentence 2 0
No sentence-level conversations. Start one.
New Conversation
Paragraph 4, Sentence 3 0
No sentence-level conversations. Start one.
New Conversation
Paragraph 0
No paragraph-level conversations. Start one.
New Conversation
Paragraph 4, Sentence 5 0
No sentence-level conversations. Start one.

I lost two cities, lovely ones. And, vaster,
some realms I owned, two rivers, a continent.
I miss them, but it wasn’t a disaster.

New Conversation
Paragraph 5 0
No paragraph-level conversations. Start one.
New Conversation
Paragraph 5, Sentence 1 0
No sentence-level conversations. Start one.
New Conversation
Paragraph 5, Sentence 2 0
No sentence-level conversations. Start one.
New Conversation
Paragraph 5, Sentence 3 0
profile_photo
May 15
JULISSA ARROYO (May 15 2019 2:20PM) : These new lost things are confusing, because i don't think its possible. [Edited] more

In this sentence caught my eye because she was giving examples of things she has lost and then all of sudden she starts stating bigger things. Like in this sentence, how can you lose places, that i am pretty sure cannot be owned by a person nor the richest person in the world?

profile_photo
May 16
ETHAN PEREZ (May 16 2019 2:13PM) : It's a metaphor Julissa, don't take it literally.
New Conversation
Paragraph 0
No paragraph-level conversations. Start one.
New Conversation
Paragraph 5, Sentence 5 0
No sentence-level conversations. Start one.

—Even losing you (the joking voice, a gesture
I love) I shan’t have lied. It’s evident
the art of losing’s not too hard to master
though it may look like (Write it!) like disaster.

New Conversation
Paragraph 6 0
No paragraph-level conversations. Start one.
New Conversation
Paragraph 6, Sentence 1 0
profile_photo
May 20
JULISSA ARROYO (May 20 2019 11:49AM) : What did she mean/ want to show with saying this?
New Conversation
Paragraph 6, Sentence 2 0
No sentence-level conversations. Start one.
New Conversation
Paragraph 6, Sentence 3 0
No sentence-level conversations. Start one.
New Conversation
Paragraph 6, Sentence 4 0
No sentence-level conversations. Start one.
New Conversation
Paragraph 6, Sentence 5 0
No sentence-level conversations. Start one.

Elizabeth Bishop, “One Art” from The Complete Poems 1926-1979. Copyright © 1979, 1983 by Alice Helen Methfessel. Reprinted with the permission of Farrar, Straus & Giroux, LLC. Source: The Complete Poems 1926-1979 (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 1983)

New Conversation
Paragraph 7 0
No paragraph-level conversations. Start one.
New Conversation
Paragraph 7, Sentence 1 0
No sentence-level conversations. Start one.
New Conversation
Paragraph 7, Sentence 2 0
No sentence-level conversations. Start one.
New Conversation
Paragraph 7, Sentence 3 0
No sentence-level conversations. Start one.
New Conversation
Paragraph 7, Sentence 4 0
No sentence-level conversations. Start one.

DMU Timestamp: March 29, 2019 18:11

General Document Comments 0
Start a new Document-level conversation

Image
0 comments, 0 areas
add area
add comment
change display
Video
add comment

Quickstart: Commenting and Sharing

How to Comment
  • Click icons on the left to see existing comments.
  • Desktop/Laptop: double-click any text, highlight a section of an image, or add a comment while a video is playing to start a new conversation.
    Tablet/Phone: single click then click on the "Start One" link (look right or below).
  • Click "Reply" on a comment to join the conversation.
How to Share Documents
  1. "Upload" a new document.
  2. "Invite" others to it.

Logging in, please wait... Blue_on_grey_spinner