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A Description of the Morning

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Read and annotate the following poem. Feel free to respond to your peers' annotations. Then conclude by writing a statement that compares this poem to our previous poem, "The Chimney Sweeper."

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____________________________________________

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A Description of the Morning

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Oct 26
Brooke H (Oct 26 2020 1:38PM) : The structure is similar to the "Chimney Sweeper" with the rhyming at the end of each line, imitating a children's nursery rhyme
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BY JONATHAN SWIFT

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Now hardly here and there a hackney-coach

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Oct 26
Brooke H (Oct 26 2020 1:43PM) : I didn't know what a hackney coach was so I looked it up :a four wheeled carriage pulled by horses
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Oct 27
Olivia B (Oct 27 2020 10:08PM) : In the first stanza (lines 1-4) the speaker is describing the early hours. Noting the few “hackney-coach[es]”. Betty is introduced where she leaves “her master’s bed”. assumed that she has been sleeping with her boss and she is assumed to be a child.
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Appearing, show'd the ruddy morn's approach.

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Oct 28
Kristina W (Oct 28 2020 2:44PM) : Ruddy means of a red color. Both poems use different colors to describe the scenes.
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Now Betty from her master's bed had flown,

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Oct 26
Brooke H (Oct 26 2020 1:40PM) : Using the person's name makes that poem so much more personal and intimate. It creates a vulnerability to the piece, much like the Chimney Sweeper
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Oct 27
Kayla G (Oct 27 2020 4:12PM) : "Master" refers to the loss of parents from being sold to be a chimney sweeper
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Oct 28
Ava M (Oct 28 2020 10:36AM) : The word "master" shows that Betty does not belong to her parents anymore, and she is not in a loving family. It adds pathos to the piece by making the reader automatically feel bad for Betty and her situation just like the feeling of sympathy for Tom.
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Oct 28
Ava M (Oct 28 2020 10:38AM) : The poem is told in 3rd person similar to the middle/end of The Chimney Sweeper
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And softly stole to discompose her own.

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Oct 27
Olivia B (Oct 27 2020 10:09PM) : The way Betty’s actions are described, “softly”, “discomposed” shows her embarrassment or her disappointment in her herself
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The slip-shod 'prentice from his master's door

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Oct 27
Olivia B (Oct 27 2020 10:11PM) : A different character is introduced, “slip-shod” makes him sound irresponsible and maybe lazy. Especially describing his job of cleaning the floor, “par’d” the first by just moving it around
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Had par'd the dirt, and sprinkled round the floor.

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Oct 28
Gracie W (Oct 28 2020 5:57PM) : Instead of doing a thorough job and actually clean the floor, instead the boy just moves the dirt around to make it appear cleaner
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Now Moll had whirl'd her mop with dext'rous airs,

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Oct 27
Bradley W (Oct 27 2020 1:53PM) : This piece switches who the speaker talks about. Same as in the "Chimney Sweeper" as the speaker switched to Tom rather than himself. [Edited]
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Oct 27
Olivia B (Oct 27 2020 10:13PM) : It’s as if the speaker is comparing the “prentice” to “Moll” showing that “Moll” is much more dedicated to the job. “whirling her mop with dext’rous airs”, “[prepared] i scrub the entry and the stairs”
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Oct 28
Gracie W (Oct 28 2020 5:59PM) : Moll could be compared to Tom and other characters from "Chimney Sweeper" because although she may not care for her jobs, she doesn't show dislike and does them anyways
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Prepar'd to scrub the entry and the stairs.

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Oct 28
Kristina W (Oct 28 2020 2:50PM) : Having tasks of cleaning things and places that aren't their own. Working for someone who isn't family to them. Just like the children from the Chimney Sweeper
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The youth with broomy stumps began to trace

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Oct 28
Ava M (Oct 28 2020 10:42AM) : Talks about the other children working and cleaning just like the Chimney Sweeper mentions the other "thousands of sweepers" working.
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The kennel-edge, where wheels had worn the place.

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Oct 28
Gracie W (Oct 28 2020 6:01PM) : -a gutter at the edge of a street
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The small-coal man was heard with cadence deep;

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Till drown'd in shriller notes of "chimney-sweep."

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Oct 27
Kayla G (Oct 27 2020 4:18PM) : This line relates to the line in the other poem, where the child is weeping, but actually saying 'sweep'
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Oct 28
Ava M (Oct 28 2020 10:55AM) : Exposes the harsh reality of kids being forced to work in these dangerous environments just like The Chimney Sweeper does when talking about the dirty children and the "coffins of black".
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Duns at his lordship's gate began to meet;

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Oct 28
Kristina W (Oct 28 2020 2:09PM) : 15-17 there's a small child that is heard from the chimney till the shill sounds are heard no more. Then the boy is meet with "heavens gate". Like in the Chimney Sweeper with imagery of heaven.
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And brickdust Moll had scream'd through half a street.

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Oct 28
Gracie W (Oct 28 2020 6:08PM) : I'm sure there's more ways to interoperate this but if Kristina's comment to the previous line is true it leads me to believe Moll is yelling for help- a child is stuck in a chimney
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The turnkey now his flock returning sees,

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Duly let out a-nights to steal for fees.

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The watchful bailiffs take their silent stands;

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Oct 26
Brooke H (Oct 26 2020 1:41PM) : There is lots of intense description and imagery throughout the poem
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Oct 28
Kristina W (Oct 28 2020 2:27PM) : The bailiffs are the police coming to the scene of the boy in the chimney. With them silently watching and doing nothing. Shows how no one will help the remaining chimney cleaners. Just like in Chimney Sweeper where their only escape was death.
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Oct 28
Gracie W (Oct 28 2020 5:50PM) : I like that! It shows how common this event was and how it was accepted to an extent. [Edited]
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And schoolboys lag with satchels in their hands.

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Oct 27
Kayla G (Oct 27 2020 4:15PM) : "schoolboys" and "the youth" reminds the audience of the children and their innocence. This also happens in the other poem.
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Oct 27
Olivia B (Oct 27 2020 10:02PM) : This line shows “schoolboys” dragging to school, showing that they are tired .
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DMU Timestamp: August 14, 2020 20:51

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Oct 27
Bradley W (Oct 27 2020 1:49PM) : The description of jobs and professions compare to the "Chimney Sweeper" as they are people almost trapped there, trying to find a way to make it through.
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Oct 27
Kayla G (Oct 27 2020 4:11PM) : In this poem, there is no 'release' from the life of being a chimney sweeper. Whereas, the other poem had a release caused from death.
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Oct 28
Ava M (Oct 28 2020 10:47AM) : Both poems use rhymes at the end of each line mimicking a children's nursery rhyme, usually filled with joy but in these cases, filled with mistreatment, labor, and depression.
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