NowComment
2-Pane Combined
Comments:
Full Summaries Sorted

3rd period Excerpt from Chief Seattle's speech

0 General Document comments
0 Sentence and Paragraph comments
0 Image and Video comments


At some point, maybe in 1854, a Suquamish chief named Seathl visited Seattle, Washington. According to several of the people present, he gave a speech to the militant governor of the state of Washington, who had proposed that the Suquamish move to a reservation. Seathl spoke in Lushootseed, which was translated into Chinook Trade Language, then into English. Dr. Henry Smith published a “reconstruction” of that possible speech in the Seattle Sunday Star on Oct. 29, 1887. It was concocted from Smith’s “admittedly incomplete” notes. This is an excerpt from what was published:

New Conversation
Paragraph 1 0
No paragraph-level conversations. Start one.
New Conversation
Paragraph 1, Sentence 1 0
No sentence-level conversations. Start one.
New Conversation
Paragraph 1, Sentence 2 0
No sentence-level conversations. Start one.
New Conversation
Paragraph 1, Sentence 3 0
No sentence-level conversations. Start one.
New Conversation
Paragraph 1, Sentence 4 0
No sentence-level conversations. Start one.
New Conversation
Paragraph 1, Sentence 5 0
No sentence-level conversations. Start one.
New Conversation
Paragraph 1, Sentence 6 0
No sentence-level conversations. Start one.

AUTHENTIC TEXT OF CHIEF SEATTLE'S

New Conversation
Paragraph 2 0
No paragraph-level conversations. Start one.
New Conversation
Paragraph 2, Sentence 1 0
No sentence-level conversations. Start one.

TREATY ORATION: 1854

New Conversation
Paragraph 3 0
No paragraph-level conversations. Start one.
New Conversation
Paragraph 3, Sentence 1 0
No sentence-level conversations. Start one.

---

New Conversation
Paragraph 4 0
No paragraph-level conversations. Start one.
New Conversation
Paragraph 4, Sentence 1 0
No sentence-level conversations. Start one.

We will ponder your proposition and when we decide we will let you know. But should we accept it, I here and now make this condition that we will not be denied the privilege without molestation of visiting at any time the tombs of our ancestors, friends, and children. Every part of this soil is sacred in the estimation of my people. Every hillside, every valley, every plain and grove, has been hallowed by some sad or happy event in days long vanished. Even the rocks, which seem to be dumb and dead as the swelter in the sun along the silent shore, thrill with memories of stirring events connected with the lives of my people, and the very dust upon which you now stand responds more lovingly to their footsteps than yours, because it is rich with the blood of our ancestors, and our bare feet are conscious of the sympathetic touch. Our departed braves, fond mothers, glad, happy hearted maidens, and even the little children who lived here and rejoiced here for a brief season, will love these somber solitudes and at eventide they greet shadowy returning spirits. And when the last Red Man shall have perished, and the memory of my tribe shall have become a myth among the White Men, these shores will swarm with the invisible dead of my tribe, and when your children's children think themselves alone in the field, the store, the shop, upon the highway, or in the silence of the pathless woods, they will not be alone. In all the earth there is no place dedicated to solitude. At night when the streets of your cities and villages are silent and you think them deserted, they will throng with the returning hosts that once filled them and still love this beautiful land. The White Man will never be alone.

New Conversation
Paragraph 5 0
No paragraph-level conversations. Start one.
New Conversation
Paragraph 5, Sentence 1 0
profile_photo
Sep 16
Riley M (Sep 16 2020 12:27PM) : "Ponder" and "proposition" make the sentence feel formal, but "decide" and "let you know" make it feel somewhat less formal. more

“Ponder” and “proposition” are not words you hear all the time. They’re most often used in more serious contexts. Using both in the same sentence gives off a feeling of formality. However, I feel like it’s somewhat undercut by the choice to use “decide” and “let you know”, which are much less formal word choices. Seeing as this had to have been translated, I wonder what the translator’s thoughts were on this. Did they intend for there to be this shift in tone?

profile_photo
Sep 16
Josiah H (Sep 16 2020 2:26PM) : It's a sign of intelligence more

I fully agree. For someone who people thought for years were “inferior to them”, the author really shows high intelligence to not only use such words, but to use them in a way that would be understanding to all that read it.

New Conversation
Paragraph 5, Sentence 2 0
profile_photo
Sep 16
Willem A (Sep 16 2020 12:20PM) : Language= pretty harsh, terms like molestation make the indigenous people seemed preyed upon (they kinda were)
profile_photo
Sep 16
Ronan L (Sep 16 2020 12:29PM) : You are taking the language out of its historical context more

The term molestation was less negative and simply meant harassed. The term especially in the form of Native Americans and the treaties made with them just meant that they could leave a reservation and go to the graves of their family. Or in other words they were just asking to have a permanent passport/visa to go back to their land for religious and spiritual reasons.

profile_photo
Sep 16
Khalanie W (Sep 16 2020 12:28PM) : very strong with his words, aggressive and passionate about the things he is saying
profile_photo
Sep 16
Ronan L (Sep 16 2020 12:36PM) : Like I said to Willem you are taking the language out of its context more

In the situation they are negotiating a treaty and the ability to freely go to their family graves was an essential clause in the treaty. While he is passionate he is not trying to be aggressive he is instead trying to set an essential requirement for him to sign the treaty. In the modern day we see molest as extremely negative however at the time it was less negative. In this case it was just referring to the ability to move through the U.S. from their reservation to visit their ancestor’s graves.

profile_photo
Sep 16
Tiffani Z (Sep 16 2020 12:36PM) : I agree more

The speaker chose his words carefully and made sure each one had meaning

profile_photo
Sep 16
chico w (Sep 16 2020 5:57PM) : Molestation more

Weird choice of wording as molestation could be used as in a different situation but it’s used as visiting or remembering the ancestors as such

profile_photo
Sep 16
Tuong D (Sep 16 2020 9:36PM) : Well another definition of molestation is the action of pestering someone else in a persistent manner, so he must've used it that way.
profile_photo
Sep 16
Charlotte S (Sep 16 2020 9:36PM) : molestation more

I am honestly so confused by the use of this word here, there maybe be a different definition with historical context but reading this kinda confused me.

New Conversation
Paragraph 5, Sentence 3 0
profile_photo
Sep 16
Josiah H (Sep 16 2020 2:20PM) : Every [Edited] more

I see that this would mean that this would mean that anything this person sees is important to this person and their people.

profile_photo
Sep 16
Sam B (Sep 16 2020 2:56PM) : Words like 'soil' and 'sacred', given the context of land being taken away, gives off a somber tone. He mentions how this land is very important to their culture, explaining why the tone would be so.
profile_photo
Sep 16
Myra S (Sep 16 2020 4:19PM) : sacred more

The writer mentions how the soil is “sacred” which gives the reader the impression that the land means a lot to them

profile_photo
Sep 16
Jonathan S (Sep 16 2020 4:43PM) : the way he uses "estimation" shows the value of his peoples work. more

“estimation” means a rough calculation of the value of something, so by him saying this hes saying that the land there being pushed off of is the culmination of his peoples life work.

profile_photo
Sep 16
chico w (Sep 16 2020 5:51PM) : Sacred more

By using this term is a choice of words which is diction why this diction is because the author is referring to the soil as being sacred which is a weird choice of words

profile_photo
Sep 16
Tuong D (Sep 16 2020 9:50PM) : I agree this is a weird word choice but I think that he used that word to emphasize the importance of the soil.
New Conversation
Paragraph 5, Sentence 4 0
profile_photo
Sep 16
Ronan L (Sep 16 2020 12:23PM) : History more

The use of every shows the uniformity of the nature of the land in its importance and “hallowed” shows that the land has a religious value and further emphasizes the importance given to the land by Chief Seattle

profile_photo
Sep 16
Aidan W (Sep 16 2020 12:26PM) : every more

this word is repeated to emphisize hat EVERY place in this area hold a memory to them

profile_photo
Sep 16
Tiffani Z (Sep 16 2020 12:27PM) : Every more

By repeating the word “every” multiple times it is showing that the speaker is trying to emphasize their point. They are wanting to emphasize that nothing goes untouched in same way, shape, or form.

profile_photo
Sep 16
jacie o (Sep 16 2020 4:01PM) : Hallowed more

The use of the word hallowed helps to emphasize the significance of the lands inhabited by the natives.

profile_photo
Sep 16
Myra S (Sep 16 2020 4:30PM) : I really liked the diction the writer used throughout the passage, but especially in this sentence because it truly emphasizes how the writer feels about the land
profile_photo
Sep 16
Myra S (Sep 16 2020 4:12PM) : every more

This word is used multiple times because the writer is trying to emphasize the value that place holds to them

profile_photo
Sep 17
Feras H (Sep 17 2020 10:47AM) : The author uses the Word "Vanished" to emphasize how long ago these peoples memories were and it helps to build the true significance of these people
New Conversation
Paragraph 5, Sentence 5 0
profile_photo
Sep 16
Willem A (Sep 16 2020 12:21PM) : iincredibly descriptive, uses lively language to create an emotional diction.
profile_photo
Sep 16
Sam B (Sep 16 2020 3:22PM) : Showcases how important this land is to them and gives us a better idea as to why the tone is the way that it is.
profile_photo
Sep 16
Myra S (Sep 16 2020 4:26PM) : The diction used here really emphasizes the importance the land really in to these people.
profile_photo
Sep 16
Jonathan S (Sep 16 2020 4:09PM) : Makes it very clear that the chief believes that the memories, and history the natives created will be with the "white men forever"
profile_photo
Sep 16
Stuuti S (Sep 16 2020 5:30PM) : dumb, dead [Edited] more

The diction “dumb” and “dead” used in this sentence are informal compared to the word swelter and silent shore use in the same sentence. These two different dictions are also used to compare one another.

profile_photo
Sep 16
Rejanae W (Sep 16 2020 5:45PM) : The diction used provides the readers with how important the land is to them and the tone has a nostalgic sense to it.
profile_photo
Sep 16
chico w (Sep 16 2020 5:55PM) : Swelter more

This a type of diction because the choice of wording. This is referring sun over-rising the surface of the ocean

profile_photo
Sep 16
Tuong D (Sep 16 2020 9:22PM) : Rock more

Choosing to describe a rock with so much meaning just shows how important the littlest details are to these people.

profile_photo
Sep 16
Charlotte S (Sep 16 2020 9:41PM) : blood of our ancestors more

the blood of ancestors could be alluding to the horrible things that have been done to the natives while also showing their connection to the earth and life.

New Conversation
Paragraph 5, Sentence 6 0
profile_photo
Sep 16
Owen K (Sep 16 2020 12:29PM) : somber solitudes, shadowy more

This grim, dark diction contrasts heavily with the light, joyous tone of the first clause. The sentence as a whole conveys a positive attitude, so it seems strange to use such gloomy words.

profile_photo
Sep 16
Sam B (Sep 16 2020 3:57PM) : The tone as a whole seems quite negative, however I can see how you would say the tone is joyous for this sentence. Things like happy heartened maidens, and rejoiced for a brief season, give off a joyous tone that is conflicted with very dark diction.
New Conversation
Paragraph 5, Sentence 7 0
profile_photo
Sep 16
Willem A (Sep 16 2020 12:26PM) : Why do the indigenous peoples call themselves Red Men?
profile_photo
Sep 16
Sam B (Sep 16 2020 1:33PM) : Probably has to do with the fact that this is being translated by a white man 3 years later. Most likely didn't actually call themselves that.
profile_photo
Sep 16
Jonathan S (Sep 16 2020 5:02PM) : my assumption would be because red was there racial identifier as i'm pretty sure they were called redskins too.
profile_photo
Sep 16
jacie o (Sep 16 2020 4:19PM) : invisible more

The word invisible implies that something is present but it cannot be seen. The use of this word proves how truly sacred these lands were because the natives will forever live and appreciate the land.

profile_photo
Sep 16
Rejanae W (Sep 16 2020 5:57PM) : "The invisible dead of my tribe", is less about the dead and more about the living.It's to focus on the memory of the people who died and not about the sadness of their deaths.
profile_photo
Sep 16
Charlotte S (Sep 16 2020 9:44PM) : red man more

I have never heard of an indigenous person using the phrase Red man, at least not in this context, this is definitely something that was changed in translation by a white person.

profile_photo
Sep 17
Feras H (Sep 17 2020 10:50AM) : This Sentence shows how even when the Indigenous peoples knew they were no match for the white settlers, their strong faith made feel reassured that even when they are gone they will always be in the land, whether they're dead or alive.
New Conversation
Paragraph 5, Sentence 8 0
profile_photo
Sep 16
Rejanae W (Sep 16 2020 6:09PM) : Solitude more

“Dedicated to solitude”, adds to the sentence before about how their children will not be alone.Their children can walk by themselves and be in touch with their ancestors.There may not be a place on earth for solitude,but I think walking with your ancestors is close enough.

New Conversation
Paragraph 5, Sentence 9 0
No sentence-level conversations. Start one.
New Conversation
Paragraph 5, Sentence 10 0
profile_photo
Sep 16
Aidan W (Sep 16 2020 12:24PM) : Alone more

this word is used quite often in the latter part of this text, to emphisize several times that even when the Europeans are gone, the area will still contain memories and the dead bodies of the Natives.

profile_photo
Sep 16
Willem A (Sep 16 2020 12:29PM) : So Chief is saying that although the White people will push natives off their land, said land will always be connected to the natives, and thus the White People will never truly be able to fully push the natives away
profile_photo
Sep 16
Owen K (Sep 16 2020 7:10PM) : That is an interesting perspective on this sentence -- I would have taken it to mean more that "White Man" is too caught up in colonialism/industrialism to savor solitude.
profile_photo
Sep 16
Josiah H (Sep 16 2020 2:23PM) : Alone more

So…is this a sign of “we’ll keep an eye on these white people” or “We’ll make sure that these white people fear us”?

profile_photo
Sep 16
jacie o (Sep 16 2020 4:23PM) : alone more

Its kind of like hes saying that the natives will haunt them

profile_photo
Sep 17
Feras H (Sep 17 2020 10:53AM) : Shows how the Natives will always be apart of the land, no matter where they go, and their memories will always live within the land, no matter what the thriving race is at the time.

---

New Conversation
Paragraph 6 0
No paragraph-level conversations. Start one.
New Conversation
Paragraph 6, Sentence 1 0
No sentence-level conversations. Start one.

New Conversation
Paragraph 7 0
No paragraph-level conversations. Start one.
New Conversation
Whole Image 0
No whole image conversations. Start one.
New Conversation
Whole Image 0
No whole image conversations. Start one.

Chief Seathl Dr. Henry Smith

New Conversation
Paragraph 8 0
No paragraph-level conversations. Start one.
New Conversation
Paragraph 8, Sentence 1 0
No sentence-level conversations. Start one.

DMU Timestamp: September 03, 2020 08:33

General Document Comments 0
Start a new Document-level conversation

profile_photo
Sep 16
Sara J (Sep 16 2020 11:54AM) : Reliability more

One of the most interesting things about this document is the tension between the unbelievably unreliable nature of the text itself and the diction choices Dr. Smith employs on Chief Seathl’s behalf. Think about the layers of intention behind this text as you read. Whose words are these, how can you tell, what is the tone created, and what is the purpose of the document as a whole?
DON’T REPLY TO THIS COMMENT! Instead, create comments of your own and reply to each other!

profile_photo
Sep 16
Rowen G (Sep 16 2020 12:26PM) : Tone and Purpose more

This document has a very passionate feel. Talking about how every part of the land has feelings, people, and stories connected to it. Therefore, even if they one day die out they will forever remain attached to the land they lived on.

profile_photo
Sep 16
Tiffani Z (Sep 16 2020 12:29PM) : I agree more

You can tell that the speaker is very passionate about what they are talking about and that it means alot to them.

profile_photo
Sep 16
Sam B (Sep 16 2020 3:06PM) : Diction and tone more

The diction is very formal, and he is using very formal English. We aren’t sure if this is exactly what he said, since this was translated. The diction used given the circumstances creates a very serious and somber tone. He is pleading for his people to still be able to return to this land since it is so important to him and his people. Quite sad.

profile_photo
Sep 16
Owen K (Sep 16 2020 7:11PM) : Yeah, I really would like to have read the original speech -- while the tone probably remained the same, it seems like so much interesting diction would have been filtered out.
Image
0 comments, 0 areas
add area
add comment
change display
Video
add comment

Quickstart: Commenting and Sharing

How to Comment
  • Click icons on the left to see existing comments.
  • Desktop/Laptop: double-click any text, highlight a section of an image, or add a comment while a video is playing to start a new conversation.
    Tablet/Phone: single click then click on the "Start One" link (look right or below).
  • Click "Reply" on a comment to join the conversation.
How to Share Documents
  1. "Upload" a new document.
  2. "Invite" others to it.

Logging in, please wait... Blue_on_grey_spinner