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Bonds forged in hardship stand test of time as Irish donors thank Native Americans 173 years on copy 04

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GREAT events are etched in our DNA.

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The most traumatic episodes of history weave themselves into our marrow and define who we are for generations, if not forever.

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Megan Levandoski (Nov 20 2020 8:23AM) : This is like Thanksgiving more

I think another example of this is when the colonists had really just gotten to America and then a very hard winter came and the colonists didn’t know what do. Lots of colonists died until the Native Americans came along and helped them. And now every year we have thanksgiving

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Tanner Windemuller (Nov 20 2020 9:15AM) : I like how you connected this with the colonists during this time.
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One of the most defining moments in Irish history was the Great Famine — 1845-1849.

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During that time, one million of us, out of a population of eight million, perished, while a further one million fled and sought sanctuary in America and Britain.

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Charlee Keller (Nov 20 2020 8:20AM) : Population more

This was a big population and at lest 2,000 of them died or whent out of the country this just shows that depending on how bad it is stuff like this takes a huge pole on population

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Marcy Hartzler (Nov 20 2020 8:21AM) : So true! I wonder how this would impact other areas of life, like the economy or ways of life.
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Charlee Keller (Nov 20 2020 8:23AM) : Mhm more

They would have to adapt a lot probably to less people and less workers

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A quarter of us either died or escaped a starving Ireland in the space of four terrible years.

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Lachlan Thoreson (Nov 20 2020 8:20AM) : Why did only a quarter (I know it says either died or escaped)? I feel like if your whole country was starving, more than about a quarter would leave.
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Charlee Keller (Nov 20 2020 8:22AM) : Maybe they weren’t aloud to leave?
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Marcy Hartzler (Nov 20 2020 8:22AM) : Good thought! How did the rest survive? What toll did that take on them in the long run?
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The trauma of the Great Hunger had a profound effect on what Ireland and its people were to become.

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Tanner Windemuller (Nov 20 2020 8:26AM) : How hard it was. more

During this time it was deadly, a war was happening for the Irish fled for food, and safety. If this never happened, America wouldn’t be itself, today. The Hunger problem was both good, and bad. The good part was, that they came, more people in America to be developed faster, and new ideas came. The bad part, is that there was a war and the great hunger was happening, so many, many people died.

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We are still working it out, if truth be told.

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The one million Irish who landed in America between 1845 and 1851 helped to forge the young United States, a country barely 80 years old.

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Marcy Hartzler (Nov 20 2020 8:15AM) : Connection to the Civil War more

The Irish are trying to escape something hard in their home country, so they go to the US. However, around this time, things are heating up and leading to the Civil War in the US. These people have to go from one hard thing to another.

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Our people created its nascent police forces. It joined its armies, of the north and of the south.

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Abigail Smolinski (Nov 20 2020 8:21AM) : Edit to prediction more

This kind of makes me think that it’s not a positive interaction between the Native Americans and the Irish if they created police forces?

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Charlee Keller (Nov 20 2020 8:24AM) : Maybe more

Or maybe they think that they need new police for making shout that there people aren’t in danger from other things?

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Megan Levandoski (Nov 20 2020 8:53AM) : Good thought more

I agree, maybe the Natives didn’t help and they were taking/not giving them recourses. I never would have thought of that

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Abigail Smolinski (Nov 20 2020 8:51AM) : That’s true, it still could be a positive interaction. Maybe they just don’t especially trust the Native Americans yet, and they need to be sure their people are protected?

MOST FAMOUS SPEECH

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Marcy Hartzler (Nov 20 2020 8:49AM) : This section shows how the Irish who survived the Great Famine were able to have positive impacts on many places in the US and Britain.
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Tanner Windemuller (Nov 20 2020 8:54AM) : Why was this counted as his most famous speech? more

What did he do to make this his most famous speech? Did people decide on it? Was it republican or Democratic decisions from office? How was it counted this way? And what did he say? What did he do?

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Take a tour of the battlefields of Gettysburg, where Abraham Lincoln delivered his most famous speech as American democracy lay at death’s door, and you’ll see where hundreds of Irish fought and died.

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Charlee Keller (Nov 20 2020 8:26AM) : Addressing Abby more

Abby maybe you are right maybe this was an not so good interaction but maybe not with the natives?

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Their pictures line the walls of the nearby museum, some in the Grey uniform of the Confederacy, many more in the navy blue of the Union. Denied a future in Ireland, its young built America.

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Jakoby Moore (Nov 20 2020 8:50AM) : This shows that many of the Irish fought for America possibly because they gave them safety of the potato famine
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Tanner Windemuller (Nov 20 2020 9:16AM) : I like how you mentioned how they were getting along.
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Similarly, the 300,000-500,000 Irish who landed in Britain during the same period had a profound effect on the cities of Liverpool, Manchester and Birmingham.

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Charlee Keller (Nov 20 2020 8:49AM) : Hmm more

I don’t know why but this seems like it’s going to be important later on?

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Jakoby Moore (Nov 20 2020 8:51AM) : Possibly leading to a treaty or war
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Lachlan Thoreson (Nov 20 2020 8:49AM) : I wonder if that 300,000-500,000 also left with the people that left for america?
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The Victorian quarantine, to keep the diseased and starving Irish enclosed around Liverpool, ensured it became a city of the Irish.

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Abigail Smolinski (Nov 20 2020 8:27AM) : Connection to COVID-19 more

This reminds me of the coronavirus, because right now we all have to stay enclosed in a space. I guess people do/did that for different reasons other than a virus.

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Charlee Keller (Nov 20 2020 8:47AM) : Yep more

That’s a great connection do we have any other things we could connect this to for the first paragraphs I was thinking about the Great Depression

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Lachlan Thoreson (Nov 20 2020 8:53AM) : Since no one was aloud leave, I wonder if they sent supplies to the town, or just left the irish to fend for them selves?
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Megan Levandoski (Nov 20 2020 8:50AM) : Connection more

I noticed it said Quarantine……………… I can relate. I wonder if they had to actually do quarantine like us. Like stay in your houses. Or they had to stay in their own little Irish-British town?

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Marcy Hartzler (Nov 20 2020 8:55AM) : Other impacts? more

If they were only restricted to a single area, I wonder how that impacted the way that other British people viewed them. Did that cause them to be viewed as less important or valued?

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Abigail Smolinski (Nov 20 2020 9:11AM) : That’s true Charlee [Edited] more

Thats a good one. Just kind of all of 2020 is something like that. Wasn’t there a year a while ago that had a lot of natural disasters, or did I make that up?

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When the cordon sanitaire was lifted, in the mid-1850s, the Irish helped drive the British Industrial revolution in the red-bricked cotton factories of Manchester and on the canal barges of Birmingham, a city of woolen mills.

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Marcy Hartzler (Nov 20 2020 8:56AM) : "Cordon Sanitaire" meaning more

This is a French term that basically means that people couldn’t leave a certain area so that they would not spread a disease.

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GREAT WAR

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Charlee Keller (Nov 20 2020 8:50AM) : Abby more

We’re going to want to focus on this one to support the claim about it maybe not being a friendly meeting

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Many of our people in Britain joined her armies and fought in their tens of thousands in the Great War.

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Marcy Hartzler (Nov 20 2020 8:57AM) : What was this war about?
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Abigail Smolinski (Nov 20 2020 9:13AM) : What this war is about more

I’m not sure, so I’m going to take a guess. Maybe the Irish and The Native Americans were fighting over land?

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They fell by the splintered trees at Verdun, in the bomb-cratered valleys at Longwy and in the mud at Passchendaele.

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They also fell in World War II, on the panic-strewn beaches of Dunkirk, in the thick forests of the Ardennes and on the sadistic jungle trails in Burma.

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Megan Levandoski (Nov 20 2020 8:57AM) : I notice it said WWll more

I wonder which country they were fighting against. Which country would make a bunch of Irish people fall/be killed. It was just a thought that I had.

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And after the Second World War, we Irish led the charge in rebuilding Britain, of course. Its motorways are forged in Irish blood, sweat and tears. Its gaudy 1960s high-rises too.

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Lachlan Thoreson (Nov 20 2020 8:59AM) : since the large amount of irish immigrants, I wonder if the irish population in britain is more than the british population?
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Tanner Windemuller (Nov 20 2020 9:01AM) : Irish helped. more

The Irish helped rebuild stuff after the war in Britain to give back for what Britain did for the Irish.

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Here at home, the Famine had a more profound effect on those who survived. Those who left for America and Britain left behind empty towns and villages.

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Marcy Hartzler (Nov 20 2020 8:59AM) : Different experiences more

I wonder how people who survived the famine in Ireland view the ones who chose to leave. Were they viewed as heroic or cowardly? Did it start disagreements?

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Abigail Smolinski (Nov 20 2020 8:49AM) : Connection more

This reminds me of natural disasters. I hear on the news during hurricanes and tornadoes, everyone evacuates and leaves behind their homes.

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Tanner Windemuller (Nov 20 2020 9:17AM) : How did it remind you of this?

Everywhere, the emptiness . . . nothing but the Hungry Grass.

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Charlee Keller (Nov 20 2020 8:51AM) : Huh? more

What exactly is the hungry grass?

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Megan Levandoski (Nov 20 2020 9:01AM) : ? [Edited] more

Good thought. I’m guessing the hungry grass is a strange way to say nothing left or nothing left to care for the nature and the grass is hungry? Or maybe there is absolutely nothing left, and it’s just a metaphor

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Lachlan Thoreson (Nov 20 2020 9:06AM) : I kind of agree with megan, but I think it was a way of saying starving, which could be why the guys grandfather always brought a slice of bread with him. [Edited]
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Marcy Hartzler (Nov 20 2020 9:06AM) : I looked it up! The Hungry Grass is an Irish myth that says there is a patch of grass that is cursed. Anyone who steps on it gets cursed with hunger that they can never satisfy.
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Abigail Smolinski (Nov 20 2020 9:15AM) : Weird connection that isn’t really related to what we’re doing but I had to say it more

I’m not sure why, but this reminds me of the Cheese Touch.

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My father used to tell me the story of his great grandfather, who never left the house without a slice of bread in his pocket. For fear he’d come across the Hungry Grass and fall down and die.

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The story is a part of me.

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POPULATION DECLINES

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Mayo, Galway, Clare, Limerick and Kerry on the west coast saw population declines of between 30-50 per cent during the Famine.

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Jakoby Moore (Nov 20 2020 8:53AM) : This shows an example of just how horrible this famine was
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Megan Levandoski (Nov 20 2020 9:04AM) : Yea more

Yeah because there were so many places effected by the famine it must have been horrible

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Tanner Windemuller (Nov 20 2020 9:17AM) : How bad do you think it was?
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Abigail Smolinski (Nov 20 2020 8:54AM) : Connection to lesson more

During an in-person class, I think it was science when we watched the video of the population dropping and going up. I remember we did a whole lesson on that, where we looked at graphs and things. The Famine is probably one of the reasons the population dropped during this time.

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Charlee Keller (Nov 20 2020 8:58AM) : That’s true more

I do remember seeing that big drop in population in Serena times this was a big thing that we can now add onto are nolege about that I think that’s also one of the main reasons places like the USA and Great Britain where gaining more people

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Abigail Smolinski (Nov 20 2020 9:15AM) : Corona more

When you phrased it this way, it made me think of the global pandemic we’re in right now.

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The young left. The old remained and died with no-one left to pass on the home, the land, the language. The language, the greatest loss of all. More of that later.

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Megan Levandoski (Nov 20 2020 9:06AM) : I wonder? more

I wonder if the chose to stay and die in their homeland or if they wanted to go so they could get the proper nutrition and live the ongest they could

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The Famine’s aftermath saw even more people leave.

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Lachlan Thoreson (Nov 20 2020 9:13AM) : It is crazy to see how a disasters, could kill over half a country in four years, Which could be compared to covid, it has been in the USA for almost a year and has killed 200,000+.
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Between 1850 and 1880, our population shrunk by more than three million people. America and Britain were becoming world superpowers.

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Charlee Keller (Nov 20 2020 8:56AM) : A lot more

A lot more people are going this means that there’s a lot less workers to make all the stuff and they are going to have to get more Inported goods

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Jakoby Moore (Nov 20 2020 8:58AM) : And that can lead to either it being easier to feed everyone because less people or hatter because they couldn’t transport it
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Tanner Windemuller (Nov 20 2020 9:04AM) : What did America and Britain do? more

What happened for the 3 million people to die?

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Lachlan Thoreson (Nov 20 2020 9:10AM) : They didn't necessarily die, most probably left, but a big major probably did die.
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Ireland was emptying. Ireland was dying. If it weren’t for its cities, Ireland may not have survived the cataclysm of Famine.

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The cities of Cork and Dublin were the only places to see population increases.

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Marcy Hartzler (Nov 20 2020 9:08AM) : I wonder if this was because more people moved there from the other areas or if people there were less impacted by the famine and were able to reproduce.
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And it was in those cities that the Irish fought to survive as a nation.

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YOUNG IRELAND DREAMERS

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What started with an idealistic William Smith O’Brien and a band of Young Ireland dreamers in 1848 grew into an irresistible republican movement that championed an Ireland free.

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Their dream took another 73 years to come true.

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Jakoby Moore (Nov 20 2020 8:54AM) : This shows their determination
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Tanner Windemuller (Nov 20 2020 9:18AM) : I saw it in a different way, but now I see your point.
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Charlee Keller (Nov 20 2020 9:02AM) : Determined more

These people are very detemend to make a place where people come together and have a good place to live and work

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Tanner Windemuller (Nov 20 2020 9:06AM) : Was this how long it took for something to develope? more

We have come really far, if we had the same idea in present day, it wouldn’t token a couple or month Max of a year.

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Megan Levandoski (Nov 20 2020 9:08AM) : Determined more

This shows that they were determined to make their and their childrens lifes better . Maybe even grandchildren. They worked on it for 73 long years and that’s almost a human lifetime

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The Famine and its aftermath didn’t just shape our political and economic world.
It shaped our souls.

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Lachlan Thoreson (Nov 20 2020 9:19AM) : Like how the irish are finding positive outcomes from the famine, Which I think goes along a lot with the title of this section.
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The trauma of that time was so great that the memories refuse to be extinguished.
We inherited them all. The Famine is etched in our psyche.

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It’s at the core of who we are. It’s in our very DNA.

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Not only were our people dispersed across the world, but we lost our language too.

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Abigail Smolinski (Nov 20 2020 8:56AM) : Survivors more

This just shows that the people who survived the Famon (which probably wasn’t very many) are very strong people. (Or just rich)

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Charlee Keller (Nov 20 2020 9:00AM) : Or just rich 🤣 more

Lol that’s funny abby but your very right those people whent in great numbers but somehow survived and made it into a popular place

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Jakoby Moore (Nov 20 2020 9:08AM) : Especially the strong part
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Megan Levandoski (Nov 20 2020 9:10AM) : Yeah more

Lol yeah that’s right. I bet the rich were able to get the really expensive food and be fine. I wonder if the poor would beg for food from the rich?

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HAUNTED BY THAT LOSS

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The way we speak today is haunted by that loss. The melancholy of our speech, the way we don’t say exactly what we mean, the way we communicate without saying anything.

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Abigail Smolinski (Nov 20 2020 9:00AM) : ? more

What does melancholy mean? I’ve heard it before but does anyone know what it means?

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Charlee Keller (Nov 20 2020 9:07AM) : It sort of means like sadness or somthing like that
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Jakoby Moore (Nov 20 2020 9:09AM) : It means for something to be lost or to become disappointing and sad
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Jakoby Moore (Nov 20 2020 9:09AM) : I think
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Megan Levandoski (Nov 20 2020 9:11AM) : Melancholy more

Uhm I think it means in this context the way that we present ourselves or the way we speak

We created a new language, full of the poetry of the language we lost. A unique language.
There’s a reason for that.

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Lachlan Thoreson (Nov 20 2020 9:48AM) : I can't imagine how hard it would be to make your own language.
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It helped us survive.

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Tanner Windemuller (Nov 20 2020 9:07AM) : How? more

How did it help us survive? How did a language do that, through poetry.

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Lachlan Thoreson (Nov 20 2020 9:50AM) : I agree with tanner, how does a new language help you survive? If you start from scratch (they probably aren't), you want to get food, water, and shelter. not a new language.
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And now, my point.

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Megan Levandoski (Nov 20 2020 9:12AM) : ? more

I wonder why this needed to be it’s own paragraph instead of just being a sentence in another

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At the height of our trauma in 1847, a tiny tribe of American Indians, known as the Choctaw nation, heard of our Great Hunger from an Irish adventurer tasked with resettling people west of the Mississippi river.

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Charlee Keller (Nov 20 2020 9:06AM) : Idk more

So it says the height of the trauma but I don’t realy know how long this was going on for

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They had a whip-round and raised $170 (worth about $20,000 in today’s money).

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Jakoby Moore (Nov 20 2020 8:55AM) : This shows that you don’t have to know someone for them to be nice to you [Edited]
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Megan Levandoski (Nov 20 2020 9:15AM) : Yep more

That is so true.

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Marcy Hartzler (Nov 20 2020 9:10AM) : How awesome! more

I think this is so cool that they were able to do this for a group of people they never knew and would never meet. I’m not sure I would know how to raise $20,000 if I had to!

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RELIEF EFFORT

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They spirited the money to a philanthropist in New York, who forwarded the money to the Quakers in Ireland for the relief effort.

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It was a tiny gesture, but one that was never forgotten, coming as it did during Black ’47 (in that year three million people were receiving starvation rations at soup kitchens in Ireland).

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Nov 20
Megan Levandoski (Nov 20 2020 9:15AM) : I wonder more

I know that native Americans didn’t have a lot then so to give up 20,000$ to strangers just because you have is amazing. I know that the Irish will never forget this small but kind gesture.

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This week, we returned the favour.

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Jakoby Moore (Nov 20 2020 8:59AM) : This shows that if you help someone you will get something in turn
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Through social media and news reports, the Irish public got wind of a fundraising drive for the Navajo and Hopi nation — which has been ravaged by Covid-19.

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Nov 20
Abigail Smolinski (Nov 20 2020 9:05AM) : Date of written more

I was thinking this article was written a while ago, but then I heard COVID-19. I wonder what year this was written?

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Nov 20
Charlee Keller (Nov 20 2020 9:10AM) : I think miss Marcy said this was fairly resent?
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Nov 20
Marcy Hartzler (Nov 20 2020 9:12AM) : It was written May 8, 2020. I wonder how the experience of the famine relates to the experience of COVID.
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Nov 20
Tanner Windemuller (Nov 20 2020 9:40AM) : Relatively soon.
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Nov 20
Tanner Windemuller (Nov 20 2020 9:09AM) : Anywhere where COVID-19 is, it affects everyone their differently. Through traits, traditions? People really do have different ways.
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Nov 20
Lachlan Thoreson (Nov 20 2020 9:55AM) : I think it is good to see that something that happened years ago, is coming back helping the irish now.
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In a spontaneous tribute to the Choctaw tribe, tens of thousands of Irish donations helped push the fundraiser to $3million

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Nov 20
Charlee Keller (Nov 20 2020 9:09AM) : Huh more

They had a famon but can somehow donate 3 million dollars (like how long ago was this trade made?)

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Nov 20
Jakoby Moore (Nov 20 2020 9:15AM) : A few hundred years
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Nov 20
Lachlan Thoreson (Nov 20 2020 9:57AM) : I wonder where the tribe is located now, and how the irish know about it.
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The virus has wormed its way into their reservation that straddles the Arizona, New Mexico border.

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The death-rate per head of population outstrips New York’s.

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STOOD BEHIND US

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In our hour of greatest need in 1847, the Choctaw people stood beside us.

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Nov 20
Tanner Windemuller (Nov 20 2020 9:10AM) : What and why were they standing next to us? more

Would this had make a difference if they did not, or did it a different way?

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Nov 20
Jakoby Moore (Nov 20 2020 9:14AM) : Yes it would if not for that donation Ireland would probably be one of the least populated countries on earth
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Nov 20
Lachlan Thoreson (Nov 20 2020 10:04AM) : That is a interesting question, Why did they give money to the irish, Obviously they need help, but why native americans of all people (and I don't mean that I mean that in a bad way).
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Nov 20
Charlee Keller (Nov 20 2020 9:12AM) : Again how long was this famon for all I hear is that one date and nothing else
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Now, as they battle their greatest threat in four generations, we’ve wrapped our arms around them and said: “We’re with you.”

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Megan Levandoski (Nov 20 2020 9:17AM) : Good more

I think this shows that if you do something kind it will always pay back. Not only did the Natives get 3,000,000$ but they also got assistance in there greatest time of need. And I’m sure this will be a lifetime friendship

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Nov 20
Lachlan Thoreson (Nov 20 2020 10:01AM) : Since the native americans don't use modern technology (Or at least I don't think so), I think it great to see the irish still paying back to them, and the natives only gave them $170 dollars (20,000 now) but the irish give them $3,000,000.
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Gary Batton, chief of the Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma, said on Tuesday that the tribe was “gratified, and perhaps not at all surprised, to learn of the assistance our special friends, the Irish, are giving to the Navajo and Hopi Nations.

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“We have become kindred spirits with the Irish in the years since the Irish potato famine. We hope the Irish, Navajo and Hopi peoples develop lasting friendships, as we have.”

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Nov 20
Abigail Smolinski (Nov 20 2020 9:06AM) : Connection of the Potato Famon more

A few years ago, I remember doing a project on The Potato Famon or something.

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Nov 20
Charlee Keller (Nov 20 2020 9:11AM) : I think I heard about that project but I never really new what it was about that’s cool
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Nov 20
Abigail Smolinski (Nov 20 2020 9:19AM) : Great potato Famon or whatever more

Yeah I remember that it was sort of like all the potatoes rotted in this one country and they couldn’t eat potatoes for a year and everyone got really depressed about it.

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Nov 20
Jakoby Moore (Nov 20 2020 9:00AM) : This shows that one small gesture can make a huge change
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Nov 20
Megan Levandoski (Nov 20 2020 9:18AM) : Yep more

And it can also get you a life long friendship. The natives did something nice and they are repaying them

MEMORIES ALL WE HAVE

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People like us — the Irish and the Choctaw — never forget. For memories are all we have.

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And if we lose them, we lose our bearings in the world, and it becomes meaningless.
We’re programmed to remember. The great traumas are etched in our DNA.

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Lachlan Thoreson (Nov 20 2020 10:06AM) : i like how they compare us to computers, because they say we are programmed to remember.
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Jakoby Moore (Nov 20 2020 9:01AM) : This shows how important history is to people
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Charlee Keller (Nov 20 2020 9:13AM) : CONECTION more

There BRAINS are rewarded to remember! We learned about thisssss

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Nov 20
Abigail Smolinski (Nov 20 2020 9:07AM) : COVID-19 more

When I read this, I immediately thought of coronavirus. Just think, ten years from now are we going to completely forget about Coronavirus? I don’t think so.

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Nov 20
Charlee Keller (Nov 20 2020 9:14AM) : That’s very true more

Your right I don’t think anyone has forgotten about the Great Depression so we’re probably not going to just forget
T about the coronavirus

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Nov 20
Lachlan Thoreson (Nov 20 2020 10:08AM) : I 100% agree with you abby, I don't think we will forget covid or 2020, it will one of those things we all will remember because of all the events that happened within this year.
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Nov 20
Marcy Hartzler (Nov 20 2020 9:12AM) : What are some other great traumas in history that have helped to shape a group of people or a country?

They make us stronger. They make us who we are.

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Tanner Windemuller (Nov 20 2020 9:11AM) : A supportive message. more

They kind of go off topic with this, but I like why they did it. To show to never give up, I’m guessing.

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Nov 20
Jakoby Moore (Nov 20 2020 9:13AM) : That is the exact same reason I thought that they did that
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DMU Timestamp: November 12, 2020 20:50

General Document Comments 0
Start a new Document-level conversation

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Nov 20
Marcy Hartzler (Nov 20 2020 2:01PM) : What do you think this will be about based on the title?
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Nov 20
Ericka Hunderman (Nov 20 2020 2:08PM) : It is probably about how the crops won’t grow because there is no water.
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Nov 20
Tanner Windemuller (Nov 20 2020 2:08PM) : I think it will be how the American Indians will help the Irish with supplies, and just help them with anything they need. [Edited]
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Nov 20
Lachlan Thoreson (Nov 20 2020 2:09PM) : I think it was a famon, and the Native Americans help the irish during the famon, and now it is tradtition to thank the native americans
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Nov 20
Jakoby Moore (Nov 20 2020 2:10PM) : A problem the Irish has that African Americans helped with
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Nov 20
Jenna Ponstein (Nov 20 2020 2:27PM) : I think it’s going to be about the relationship between the American Indians and the Irish.
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Nov 20
Charlee Keller (Nov 20 2020 2:03PM) : It’s probably about a Famon or a war [Edited]
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Nov 20
Marcy Hartzler (Nov 20 2020 2:06PM) : What role do you think the Native Americans played? Was it positive or negetive?
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Nov 20
Charlee Keller (Nov 20 2020 2:07PM) : They probably made a trade for food or helped them with the war
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Nov 20
Ericka Hunderman (Nov 20 2020 2:19PM) : I agree that is good info
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Nov 20
Abigail Smolinski (Nov 20 2020 2:05PM) : I think it’s about the Native Americans and the Irish meeting during a food shortage.
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Nov 20
Marcy Hartzler (Nov 20 2020 2:06PM) : Do you think it was a positive interaction or negative?
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Nov 20
Abigail Smolinski (Nov 20 2020 2:07PM) : Maybe they shared food or something so it was a positive interaction?
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Nov 20
Megan Levandoski (Nov 20 2020 2:08PM) : I think it’s about the native Americans helping the Irish during a famine kind of like what happened when thanksgiving was created except for the Irish and Native Americans
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Nov 20
Ericka Hunderman (Nov 20 2020 2:28PM) : I think thanksgiving is probably not made here but I do think that the native Americans were helping the Irish
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Nov 20
Megan Levandoski (Nov 20 2020 2:21PM) : This is like thanksgiving [Edited] more

I think another example of this is when the colonists had really just gotten to America and then a very hard winter came and the colonists didn’t know what do. Lots of colonists died until the Native Americans came along and helped them. And now every year we have thanksgiving

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Nov 20
Tanner Windemuller (Nov 20 2020 2:22PM) : How hard it was. more

During this time it was deadly, a war was happening for the Irish fled for food, and safety. If this never happened, America wouldn’t be itself, today. The Hunger problem was both good, and bad. The good part was, that they came, more people in America to be developed faster, and new ideas came. The bad part, is that there was a war and the great hunger was happening, so many, many people died.

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Nov 20
Avary Limon (Nov 20 2020 2:26PM) : I think it’s about native Americans and what happened back then
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Nov 20
Ericka Hunderman (Nov 20 2020 2:52PM) : Tell me MORE!!
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Nov 20
Ericka Hunderman (Nov 20 2020 2:50PM) : What does the sentence “young” mean I do not know there language?
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Nov 20
Avary Limon (Nov 20 2020 2:55PM) : The Great War many people joined armies and teamed up to win many wars
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Nov 20
Avary Limon (Nov 20 2020 2:59PM) : Population declines people left old and very young behind between 1850 1880 population went down
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Nov 20
Avary Limon (Nov 20 2020 3:16PM) : Young Ireland dreamers his dream was to make a band and it took73 years
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Nov 20
Avary Limon (Nov 20 2020 3:23PM) : Haunted by the loss a lot of people have loss people they love and they are having a hard time because of it
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Nov 20
Avary Limon (Nov 20 2020 3:24PM) : Relief effort New York was saving money for a philanthropist
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Nov 20
Avary Limon (Nov 20 2020 3:25PM) : Stood behind us people helped us fight and teamed up with us
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Nov 20
Avary Limon (Nov 20 2020 3:26PM) : Memories we all have are basically talking about all the memories we have
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