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Dad and Son Discuss Growing Up Black In Mississippi - StoryCorps (09.21.2016)

Author: StoryCorps

https://youtu.be/Chr6BDPJC-o

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“Dad, why do you take me to protests so much?”

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When 9-year-old Aidan Sykes sat down to interview his dad, Albert Sykes, he had some serious questions to ask. Together, they talked about how race and gender influence the way Albert takes on his role as a father.

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Jun 10
Jeff D (Jun 10 2020 9:29PM) : This is why math matters. Why statistics are important. Those statistics are people and they have impacts on people. We lose track of the people in numbers.
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Jeff D (Jun 10 2020 9:31PM) : Wow. That's an old saying I've never heard, and I'm going to spend a chunk of the evening thinking about that. Releasing your gifts is such a great metaphor.
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In 2015, 9-year-old Aidan Sykes came to StoryCorps in Jackson, Mississippi, to ask his father, Albert, a few important questions.

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Albert and Aidan’s story is one in a series of real-life stories presented by StoryCorps and Upworthy reminding us #WhoWeAre—everyday Americans speaking to our best selves.

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Click here to listen to Albert and Aidan’s original StoryCorps interview.

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StoryCorps and Upworthy, the mission-driven media company that reaches more than 200 million people each month, have joined forces to launch #WhoWeAre, a campaign to share the stories of everyday Americans, build compassion, and offer hope to a divided nation. #WhoWeAre calls on Americans to reach across perceived divides and listen to one another.
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Click here to learn more about the campaign.
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DMU Timestamp: May 11, 2020 21:16

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Melissa G (Jun 10 2020 9:33PM) : proverb: "children are born with their fist clawed" and as you grow your hands learn to unfold to share your gifts [Edited] more Tags: protecting children

Whose children get to be protected? What does protecting children look, sound and feel like in America? What is at the core of protection in 2020?

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Jul 8
Cynthia (Cindy) B (Jul 08 2020 4:41PM) : I dont know whose children are protected in America anymore. Black children face so many barriers and dangers, all of which we knew - but now the deep hatred white people are pouring on their children is exposed and they too are an unprotected group. [Edited] more

There will never be any comparison between the long standing systemic racism poured out on black Americans and hideous passing of hatred in white family legacies ~ Your question, “Whose children get to be protected?” seems sadly to be none unless we begin to heal the deep hate. The responsibility for that healing sits squarely on the shoulders of white Americans; and I have been made profoundly aware of the push back my white friends and family have to that idea. The task at hand will not be easy nor smooth. My prayer is that God will provide a way. The challenge for Black America may also be tough, in that forgiveness is often difficult, especially when many will never ask for it. I hope that those of us who do ask through genuine efforts to become true friends, community members, neighbors, family and agents of change will be enough to cover the hardness of the hearts of those that will not. Let the change begin with me.

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