NowComment
2-Pane Combined
Comments:
Full Summaries Sorted

Let’s Talk About Making Healthcare More Accessible (video example from Ilana)

Author: Ilana Somasunderam

Somasunderam, Ilana. Let’s Talk About Making Healthcare More Accessible (Video Example from Ilana). Vimeo, KQED Teach, 31 Dec. 2019, vimeo.com/382122268.

0 General Document comments
0 Sentence and Paragraph comments
0 Image and Video comments



Let’s Talk About Making Healthcare More Accessible (video example from Ilana) from Ilana Somasundeam

New Conversation
Paragraph 1 0
No paragraph-level conversations. Start one.
New Conversation
Whole Video 0
No video-level conversations. Start one.
New Conversation
00:04 0
profile_photo

I’m the Tech Liaison for the New York City Writing Project. I… (more)

Jan 3
Paul Allison

I’m the Tech Liaison for the New York City Writing Project. I… (more)

(Jan 03 2020 3:28PM) : All I can think about is how this image must come from the 70s. Is that what's intended? Is the writer saying that this is a story from decades ago?
profile_photo
Jan 4
Christina Cantrill (Jan 04 2020 2:00PM) : I had the same thought. Which relates to having some examples by kids too that we can use as mentor texts because adult examples will inherently be filled with older references.
New Conversation
01:15 0
profile_photo

I’m the Tech Liaison for the New York City Writing Project. I… (more)

Jan 3
Paul Allison

I’m the Tech Liaison for the New York City Writing Project. I… (more)

(Jan 03 2020 3:46PM) : Funny I was just listening to a recounting of Esther Lape and Eleanor Roosevelt's efforts through the American Foundation worked for universal healthcare coverage as far back as 1935 https://www.democracynow.org/2020/1/1/eleanor_roosevelt (star at 22:17) more

This makes me think about how we can build in a fact-checking process by peers in comments on published drafts of these videos.

New Conversation
01:17 0
No conversations at 01:17. Start one.
New Conversation
01:22 0
profile_photo

I’m the Tech Liaison for the New York City Writing Project. I… (more)

Jan 3
Paul Allison

I’m the Tech Liaison for the New York City Writing Project. I… (more)

(Jan 03 2020 3:51PM) : What an interesting poll this is. It comes and goes so quickly here. Isn't it worth thinking about how Obama and healthcare legislation were a focus of our attention between 2012 and 2016 that the poll becomes more 50/50. I wonder why.
New Conversation
01:31 0
profile_photo

I’m the Tech Liaison for the New York City Writing Project. I… (more)

Jan 3
Paul Allison

I’m the Tech Liaison for the New York City Writing Project. I… (more)

(Jan 03 2020 3:53PM) : But wait... What does this have to do with government involvement in making healthcare affordable for all? I need a connection made here.
New Conversation
01:41 0
profile_photo

I’m the Tech Liaison for the New York City Writing Project. I… (more)

Jan 3
Paul Allison

I’m the Tech Liaison for the New York City Writing Project. I… (more)

(Jan 03 2020 3:58PM) : Okay, the writer is making more connections here, but the facts and the claims fly by so fast that I'm not able to really take it in. I can either accept it because it sounds like what I believe already, or I can reject it because it doesn't fit my ideas. more

What would it take to break all of this down more, give the viewer a chance to assess the data themselves, and decide whether or not it is important? I appreciate that there is a link at the bottom of the transcript, and I did study these maps there. Is that what the writer expects us to do? Further, after all of that more careful analysis, I’m still not sure what the writer is saying about how universal healthcare coverage will help to change this situation.

New Conversation
02:05 0
profile_photo

I’m the Tech Liaison for the New York City Writing Project. I… (more)

Jan 3
Paul Allison

I’m the Tech Liaison for the New York City Writing Project. I… (more)

(Jan 03 2020 4:04PM) : Okay, again, are you inviting us to study these models with you? Flashing them up here does leave me wanting to study the issue more. more

How do we find topics for these audio and video presentations that don’t just brush the surface of deeply important, complex issues? Or that really unpacks one part of the issue slowly and carefully? Why are we suggesting this speedy journalism?

New Conversation
Paragraph 0
No paragraph-level conversations. Start one.
New Conversation
Paragraph 1, Sentence 3 0
No sentence-level conversations. Start one.

Video link

New Conversation
Paragraph 2 0
No paragraph-level conversations. Start one.
New Conversation
Paragraph 2, Sentence 1 0
No sentence-level conversations. Start one.

The phone would ring, and I would let the call go to the answering machine. About half the time, it was my uncle or my best friend, and I would pick up the phone. The other half, the message would go something like this: “Hello. This is Bob from X Debt Collection Agency. According to my records your payment is 174 days past due. Since we still have not received the payment, I wanted to follow up to determine when the payment will be made to prevent legal action.”

New Conversation
Paragraph 3 0
No paragraph-level conversations. Start one.
New Conversation
Paragraph 3, Sentence 1 0
No sentence-level conversations. Start one.
New Conversation
Paragraph 3, Sentence 2 0
No sentence-level conversations. Start one.
New Conversation
Paragraph 3, Sentence 3 0
No sentence-level conversations. Start one.
New Conversation
Paragraph 3, Sentence 4 0
No sentence-level conversations. Start one.
New Conversation
Paragraph 3, Sentence 5 0
No sentence-level conversations. Start one.
New Conversation
Paragraph 3, Sentence 6 0
profile_photo

I’m the Tech Liaison for the New York City Writing Project. I… (more)

Jan 3
Paul Allison

I’m the Tech Liaison for the New York City Writing Project. I… (more)

(Jan 03 2020 3:29PM) : I like how specific this memory is.
profile_photo
Jan 4
Christina Cantrill (Jan 04 2020 2:01PM) : Agree. It's a good example that way.

Before caller ID, my parents taught me to screen phone calls. As I got older, I started to find out more details about why the collection agencies were calling. When my mom was 28, she had a brain hemorrhage as a result of a birth defect. To treat this condition, she had to undergo an experimental surgery. What followed were insane medical bills, and because she didn’t have insurance at the time, she racked up hundreds of thousands of dollars in loans. My parents worked 12-14 hour days during my childhood and were still unable to keep up with the bills. Now, over 30 years later, thankfully my mom is perfectly healthy, but it took decades to pay down our family’s medical debt.

New Conversation
Paragraph 4 0
No paragraph-level conversations. Start one.
New Conversation
Paragraph 4, Sentence 1 0
No sentence-level conversations. Start one.
New Conversation
Paragraph 4, Sentence 2 0
No sentence-level conversations. Start one.
New Conversation
Paragraph 4, Sentence 3 0
No sentence-level conversations. Start one.
New Conversation
Paragraph 4, Sentence 4 0
No sentence-level conversations. Start one.
New Conversation
Paragraph 4, Sentence 5 0
No sentence-level conversations. Start one.
New Conversation
Paragraph 4, Sentence 6 0
No sentence-level conversations. Start one.
New Conversation
Paragraph 4, Sentence 7 0
profile_photo

I’m the Tech Liaison for the New York City Writing Project. I… (more)

Jan 3
Paul Allison

I’m the Tech Liaison for the New York City Writing Project. I… (more)

(Jan 03 2020 3:30PM) : The image of a thumbs up for this sentence feels glib. The sentence is strong, but the image, not so much. I'm looking to see a picture of the writer's mom here.

The quality of medical care a person receives should not depend on their wealth. And it shouldn’t put them in infinite debt. “Medicare for All” is not a new concept. Harry Truman advocated for a national health insurance system 70 years ago. According to a Gallup poll, 57% of Americans feel that it is the responsibility of the government to make sure all Americans have healthcare coverage. Only 34% have “very or somewhat positive” views of the healthcare industry. Most striking to me are these maps of preventable hospitalizations vs. income in my home city of San Francisco. What this means is that people who are poorer have less access to primary care services, and because hospital care is more resource-intensive, it is also expensive.

New Conversation
Paragraph 5 0
No paragraph-level conversations. Start one.
New Conversation
Paragraph 5, Sentence 1 0
No sentence-level conversations. Start one.
New Conversation
Paragraph 5, Sentence 2 0
No sentence-level conversations. Start one.
New Conversation
Paragraph 5, Sentence 3 0
No sentence-level conversations. Start one.
New Conversation
Paragraph 5, Sentence 4 0
No sentence-level conversations. Start one.
New Conversation
Paragraph 5, Sentence 5 0
No sentence-level conversations. Start one.
New Conversation
Paragraph 5, Sentence 6 0
No sentence-level conversations. Start one.
New Conversation
Paragraph 5, Sentence 7 0
No sentence-level conversations. Start one.
New Conversation
Paragraph 5, Sentence 8 0
profile_photo

I’m the Tech Liaison for the New York City Writing Project. I… (more)

Jan 3
Paul Allison

I’m the Tech Liaison for the New York City Writing Project. I… (more)

(Jan 03 2020 4:01PM) : Okay, so it is the writer arguing that national health care insurance will give the poor more access to primary care services? more

Couldn’t this data actually be used to argue that poor people will use the resource-intensive hospital care more with national insurance in their pocket?

While I don’t have a stance yet on how our government should address this problem because it is difficult to forecast a policy change of this magnitude, I appreciate models that take into account how a change will impact access to preventive care for our most marginalized communities.

New Conversation
Paragraph 6 0
No paragraph-level conversations. Start one.
New Conversation
Paragraph 6, Sentence 1 0
No sentence-level conversations. Start one.

Word count: 386

New Conversation
Paragraph 7 0
No paragraph-level conversations. Start one.
New Conversation
Paragraph 7, Sentence 1 0
No sentence-level conversations. Start one.

Citations

New Conversation
Paragraph 8 0
No paragraph-level conversations. Start one.
New Conversation
Paragraph 8, Sentence 1 0
No sentence-level conversations. Start one.

DMU Timestamp: November 27, 2019 01:26

General Document Comments 0
Start a new Document-level conversation

Image
0 comments, 0 areas
add area
add comment
change display
Video
add comment

Quickstart: Commenting and Sharing

How to Comment
  • Click icons on the left to see existing comments.
  • Desktop/Laptop: double-click any text, highlight a section of an image, or add a comment while a video is playing to start a new conversation.
    Tablet/Phone: single click then click on the "Start One" link (look right or below).
  • Click "Reply" on a comment to join the conversation.
How to Share Documents
  1. "Upload" a new document.
  2. "Invite" others to it.

Logging in, please wait... Blue_on_grey_spinner