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Jul 22

I agree learners that came out of ERT class did not get the same knowledge as in-person learning but the online classes are now better prepared and the next time it will be a smoother transition from online to ERT than it was from in-person to ERT.

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Jul 22

Online Teaching and learning is a boon considering the accessibility and flexibility it can provide. But online learning in an emergency situation such as the COVID- 19 pandemic has its downfalls. With the resources available and the emergency training given to teachers, instructors and students , it was admirable on all fronts how education persevered online on such a short notice. From my experience with high school students and teachers that had to go into Emergency Remote Learning , It was a struggle for the teachers to go through the material and keep the students engaged when they weren’t physically in the same room. It was a very stressful time for K-12 teachers and classroom management. Meanwhile some of the students were struggling with paying attention online and grasping all the concepts. Nevertheless , this was born out of necessity during the pandemic and I hope such a scenario does not happen any time soon ! As the article mentions , I agree that in the case of emergency remote learning, there must be a shift in evaluation. “ From the faculty point of view, student learning outcomes would be of primary interest. Did learners achieve the intended knowledge, skills, and/or attitudes that were the focus of the instructional experience? Attitudinal outcomes are also possibly of interest, for students and for faculty. For students, issues such as interest, motivation, and engagement are directly connected to learner success and so would be possible evaluation foci. For faculty, attitudes toward online instruction and all that it entails can affect the perception of success.”

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Jul 18

The most significant difference between online learning and ERT is the structure in the creation of the classes. An online class is well-structured, well-planned, and well-created. When you start getting into ERT, it is based on the necessity to fill a void. The COVID-19 pandemic highlighted the need for effective online learning and instruction. If done right, it can be beneficial for gaining a broader spectrum of students regardless of location. It allows for flexible learning while adjusting for accessible options for learners and instructors. The pandemic showed that the classes can be set online if done correctly.

My experience was very different. The pandemic abruptly forced the need for distance-led remote instruction. Our training class was hastily assembled after getting authorization from the government to proceed. We needed a functional LMS; we dealt with technology issues and limited resources for laptops, internet hotspots, and some adult learners who still used flip phones. We were tasked with the role of creating testing, learning activities, and accessibility to an unsuspecting group of mixed-age learners. The task was completed, but only with huge drawbacks.

The students who came out of the ERT class were less knowledgeable than those who took the in-person instructor-led courses. The instructors who taught the ERT class were lacking, but it did bring a positive change to my organization: the creation of an IDD team, the procurement of an LMS, restructured classes, and a better learning environment for all upcoming classes.

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Jul 18

Emergency Remote Teaching refers to the temporary transition of instructional delivery to an online format due to an immediate crisis or emergency. The primary aim is to ensure educational continuity, allowing teaching and learning to continue despite disruptions. This method is characterized by its swift implementation, often using existing technology and digital tools to mimic traditional classroom experiences. It is typically executed with minimal planning and preparation time, utilizing available resources and materials hastily adapted for online use. Consequently, it may lack the structured design of fully online courses, with adjustments made on the fly.
In contrast, Online Learning is a deliberate and planned mode of education specifically designed for digital platforms. It encompasses a variety of instructional methods and tools crafted to create an engaging, interactive, and effective learning environment. Online learning programs are meticulously developed, often by teams of educators, instructional designers, and technologists, to harness the unique advantages of digital education.
The educational landscape has undergone significant transformation in response to COVID-19. Two terms that have gained prominence are “Emergency Remote Teaching” and “Online Learning.” While they may appear synonymous at first glance, they represent distinct approaches to education. Understanding the differences between them is crucial for educators, students, and institutions striving to optimize learning experiences.

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Jul 15

I am not a teacher in the academic space, nor do I have kids in the educational system so I’m forming my opinion on this subject, based on friends or family who are teachers, or had kids in school during the Covid-19 Pandemic.

My teacher friends had a love/hate relationship with ERT. Most of them enjoyed being able to teach from their homes, though did struggle with managing their students. The behavioral issues they would deal with in the classroom didn’t go away, but changed, and in some ways were harder to deal with. They struggled with attendance, with feeling like their kids weren’t learning enough, or were theyteaching well enough. Overall it was great emotional struggle. So much so, a few of them sought alternate careers after that first year!

My friends who were parents of kids in school pretty much hated every minute of it!

It made managing work/life balance tough. With everyone at home working or going to school it affected bandwidth on the home networks, resulting in countless technology issues, not to mention privacy to work or study with all the added distractions.

ERT was not something teachers or parents were prepared for. Whereas online Learning is typically well thought out and planned.

Hopefully we don’t have to use ERT again, but now that schools, teachers and parents better understand it, if the need arises again, hopefully we are better prepared to make it more positive experience for all.

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Jul 15

I was thinking about the hybrid course I took for one of my GIS classes. We had a synchronous in-class lecture and then the associated labs and projects were to be completed asynchronously during the week. I remember grumbling that I did not like the fact that there was an in class lecture for something that could have been done purely online.

It is one of those moments where looking back: were all of the instruction options dutifully considered before the course hit the banweb?!

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Jul 15

The United States decision to transition from a traditional in-class curriculum to online learning caused interminable confusion about how online learning, online teaching and online education genuinely function. As mentioned in last week’s blog post, I really enjoy words. And as much as words are incredible, they can be used in ways that are detrimental to their meaning. That is the exact thing that happened between the years of 2020 until the middle of 2022. Emergency Remote Teaching (ERT) may be the official term but through a massive game of telephone, ERT lost its meaning and use in the conversation. Within that conversation, it seemed as though people were conflating ERT as a 1:1 comparison with online learning and teaching. The link between the two appears strong, these are both means of relaying education, despite the underlying mechanisms shouting, “NO, DO NOT MAKE THIS ASSUMPTION!” Having a handful of teachers as friends, the number of stories that were told where distrust of technology and its ability to help teach was reason enough to highlight that the United States’ ability to transition its schools to any level of online learning and teaching was a trial in futility. Thus, within any emergency, lacking that amount of preparation, you’re hoping to survive. It’s truly incredible that despite the spate of teachers resigning, education as an institution still stands. This is also a great reminder and highlight of human ingenuity, human persistence and human evolution: there are still aspects of this life we as human beings can solve through iterative mastery.

What constitutes the difference between emergency remote teaching and traditional online learning and teaching is decidedly in the manner the learning environment is created, planned and supported. With those three tenets in hand, traditional online learning and teaching also has history, data and institutional confidence in how it is utilized in practice. What makes a good learning experience is when the instructor can build a rapport with their students, maintain a consistent lecture-esque style of class, provide multiple forms of media content (i.e. not just the book for the class, but article links, TEDxTalks, etc.) and provide time during the class for the learners to engage with the materials amongst themselves. The way in which this class and CLDT 1300 were proctored are the way I would like to work in an online learning and teaching environment. What I really truly enjoy about the way these have been proctored is that there is a major asynchronous component that requires the learner to actually use the internet. I know and understand that there are a handful of people from previous generations that would do anything else than use the internet. Accounting for this subset of people, there is an even larger subset of people who genuinely live on the internet. It is an opportunity for two different perspectives to mesh because they must engage in forum discussions because the discussions are where the rapport is built, and learning can be monitored.

A reason for why many of these online classes function, require and demand this level of participation is because there is not a “common room” (i.e. literal classroom space). Professor Richard Schwier of the University of Saskatchewan intimated that a challenge for him with online education and learning is that the “experiential factor of a classroom, walking through the door, finding their seat and managing [the] space” is lost. Those moments of preparation before class are actions that need to be physically done to truly understood how important they are to the thought of “being in a class setting.” While I understand the merit of his challenge, what I am unsure he realizes is that there is an even greater appreciation for these actions when an online learner is preparing for class: situating oneself in a space they won’t be deserved; letting the people around them know they have class and do not want to be disturbed; checking internet connection and that their computer is working properly; and most of all, being as closed to relaxed and unbothered prior to class because instead of commuting to campus, learners are commuting to their couch, office, kitchen table, etc. Allowing students to access high quality educational instruction and content in their homes on their schedule allows for potentially better outcomes because there is one less stressor removed. When the world and the internet are your classroom, when the learning management system is the repository for all the knowledge shared instructor-to-learner and learner-to-learner, online teaching and education turns the chaotic world (wide web) into a well-oiled machine.

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Jul 15

I started with my university in August 2019 and still was adjusting to my role when Emergency Remote Learning was instituted. I helped my department transition our learning and build out our blackboards for the courses as quickly as possible while supporting students in my role at the time as Academic Advisor. My own university online learning experiences were two courses that were conducted as Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) so this style of distance learning was not only a new concept for my students but for myself as well. Coordinating synchronous, online learning presented many challenges but when I think of online teaching/learning it is the format my brain goes to.

This is ironic to me because I currently teach a hybrid course and it is not the format we use to facilitate the course’s learning. Half the modules are in-person synchronous, and half the lessons are asynchronous, online. I do not feel this format works for the course and we are evaluating/updating this course as a whole and it will run with enhanced curriculum and a different format in academic year 2025-2026.I believe it does not work in it’s current “online format” as the students lose momentum switching between the two instructional styles. Attendance falls off after we had had back-to-back weeks of asynchronous work and as the semester progresses, it is like pulling teeth to get them to engage in our in-person curriculum.

Online learning to me is ideally synchronous courses conducted via distance. I believe it allows for flexibility while still engaging the learners in interactive situations and providing accessible of instruction and to the instructors. It also provides structure that some students may not be able to adhere to in asynchronous online learning environments.

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Jul 10

“What we know from research is that effective online learning results from careful instructional design and planning, using a systematic model for design and development. The design process and the careful consideration of different design decisions have an impact on the quality of the instruction. And it is this careful design process that will be absent in most cases in these emergency shifts.”

At the time of the pandemic, I was a 5th grade teacher and I also have kids who experienced emergency remote teaching during this time. From both the online teaching and online learning perspectives, the above quote is the most relevant to why there were so many misses and fails with emergency remote teaching/learning. The success of these experience varied due to expertise, available resources, and level of support for both teachers and learners. Compounded with the global crisis of people dying and families handling the myriad of changes to our everyday lives (remember grocery shopping during that time?!?!), it is easy to understand how for many, this period of learning for student and teachers was set up for failure.

There just wasn’t enough time, expertise, and resources to do it right. I have memories of my 5 year old being on live Zooms the MOST and my children in high school expected to navigate posting things online, juggling multiple google classroom pages, and having to interact with their teachers in very different ways. I have to believe that teachers were doing their absolute best to make do with the situation, but the reality is that many online learning experiences were not fully developed or based on pedagogically appropriate decisions.

While I applaud the problem-solving and creativity of both teachers, students, and families during this time, I also recognize how unfair it was for many people who were going through incredibly challenging times. Issues of accessibility, equitable learning experiences, and building strong methods of communication with students and families were the most problematic from the teaching and learning perspective.

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Jul 9

When I hear “Online Teaching and Learning” I tend to think less of timed classroom-like experiences, and more of self-directed knowledge bases. Most of my online learning has happened using sites like Khan Academy, Wikipedia, LinkedIn Learning, or YouTube. These sites don’t have “classes” or “Semesters” and the expectations of teachers are quite different. Teachers in these paradigms just design the content one time, then post it. It’s much more “Sage on the Stage” than examples like this class.

In my past, I’ve found tasks like written reflections unnecessary, but these courses at Villanova have shown me the value in them. The best way to learn is by teaching, and working together with the class fills that role somewhat. More than Duolingo or something similar anyway.

I find the text History and State of Distance Education encouraging when the authors say things like “Our results indicate that distance education, when properly planned, designed, and supported by the appropriate mix of technology and pedagogy, is equivalent to, or in certain scenarios more effective than, traditional face-to-face classroom instruction.” Hopefully education as a whole will continue to improve, distance education in particular.

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Jul 9

Certainly! Let’s turn some of these theoretical insights into practical classroom activities for your 2nd grade classroom.

  1. Chapter 1: Leveraging Students’ Preconceptions

Quote:
> “If their initial understanding is not engaged, they may fail to grasp the new concepts and information that are taught, or they may learn them for purposes of a test but revert to their preconceptions outside the classroom” (pp. 14-15).

Practical Activity:
Concept Mapping
- Materials Needed:
– Large sheets of paper or poster board
– Markers or crayons
– Sticky notes

- Activity:
Start a new unit by asking students to draw what they already know about the topic. For example, if you’re beginning a unit on plants, ask children to draw a plant and label its parts. Have them use sticky notes to add their thoughts on what plants need to grow. As the unit progresses, update the map with new knowledge, showing how original ideas evolved.

- Why Implement It?
This engages their pre-existing knowledge and visually shows the progression of their learning. This process helps students anchor new information to what they already know.

  1. Chapter 2: Developing Expertise

Quote:
> “Experts notice features and meaningful patterns of information that novices do not notice” (p. 36).

Practical Activity:
Pattern Recognition Games
- Materials Needed:
– Sets of cards or objects with different shapes, colors, and patterns

- Activity:
Create a ‘Pattern Detective’ game where students have to find and describe patterns. For instance, cards with different sequences of shapes or colors can be used, and students have to group them based on identified patterns. This could be a fun and interactive way for them to start noticing and talking about patterns.

- Why Implement It?
Encouraging students to recognize and articulate patterns helps them begin to think like ‘experts’ in their own way, enhancing their observational and critical thinking skills.

  1. Chapter 3: Effective Transfer

Quote:
> “Initial learning is essential for transfer” (p. 53).

Practical Activity:
Real-World Connections and Reflections
- Materials Needed:
– Storybooks or short articles
– Reflection Journals

- Activity:
After teaching a concept (like the life cycle of a butterfly), read a related storybook. Ask students to relate the events in the story to what they learned in class. They can draw or write in their reflection journals about how the story connects to the real-world learning.

- Why Implement It?
By connecting classroom learning to real-world situations, students are more likely to transfer their understanding across different contexts. It also integrates literacy skills with content knowledge.

  1. Inviting Reflection:

As you dive back into the text, how might you further adapt these ideas to account for the unique cultural and social perspectives of your students? Are there any particular preconceptions your students bring that could serve as a foundation for deeper learning?

Feel free to share your thoughts or adaptations!

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Jul 9

Hey Colleen! Drawing from the text “How People Learn,” there’s immense potential for enriching your Culinary Arts classes. Let’s stay focused on your key questions: “Using students’ preconceptions is a good way to start my lessons. How can I assess whether students retain and use new learning? When students retain preconceived notions, how can I reteach effectively?”

Assessing Retention and Use of New Learning:

From the Text:
“A metacognitive approach to instruction can help students learn to take control of their own learning by defining learning goals and monitoring their progress in achieving them” (p. 18).

Application:
In your classroom, after introducing a new skill like “Knife Techniques,” have students set personal learning goals and periodically self-assess their progress. They could use a reflective journal or a digital portfolio to document their journey, noting any improvements or persistent challenges. This aligns with the recommendation to help students “organize knowledge in ways that facilitate retrieval and application” (p. 16).

You could also employ practical assessments where students demonstrate the skill they’ve learned in various contexts. For example, evaluating their knife skills not just in a controlled environment but during the preparation of a complex dish. Observing their consistency and comfort with the technique would indicate whether the learning has been retained and internalized.

When Students Retain Preconceived Notions:

From the Text:
“If their initial understanding is not engaged, they may fail to grasp the new concepts and information that are taught” (pp. 14-15).

Reteaching Strategy:
When you notice students reverting to their initial misconceptions, consider deeper, contextualized re-engagement. For example, during the “Sanitation and Food Safety” unit, if students still believe that washing hands with water alone is sufficient, set up a demonstration comparing bacteria counts before and after washing with just water versus soapy water.

Another approach is to use peer instruction. Pair students who have mastered new concepts with those who haven’t. This strategy leverages the concept that “experts and novices solve problems differently” and can aid in knowledge transfer through peer teaching.

Practical Reteaching Tactics:
- Immediate Feedback: During cooking labs, give immediate, constructive feedback when mistakes linked to preconceived notions occur. This helps to correct them on the spot, reinforcing correct practices.
- Conceptual Discussions: Following practical assessments, hold group discussions reflecting on what went wrong in tasks linked to retained misconceptions. Encouraging students to voice their thought process and correcting it in a supportive environment can help reshape their understanding.

Connecting More Dots:
To further link the text’s recommendations to your pedagogy, consider the emphasis on “learner-centered” environments (p. 23). You could adapt this by tailoring lessons to the specific social and cultural backgrounds of your students. For instance, integrating family recipes can make learning more relatable and engaging, fostering deeper personal connections to the content.

Next Steps:
Try re-reading Chapter 1, especially the segments on engaging preconceptions and developing a conceptual framework (pp. 14-20). See if you can identify additional specific preconceptions in various culinary topics you teach and strategize on how to systematically address them.

Reflection:
How do you currently measure the retention and application of new learning in your class? Could blending these evidence-based recommendations with your existing practices amplify students’ understanding and skill retention?

Your culinary arts class operates in a dynamic, hands-on domain that naturally aligns with many of these educational psychology principles. Let’s build on this synergy to create an even more engaging and effective learning environment!

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Jul 9

These reflections on how to use metacognitive skills to teach the writing process—and your particular focus on editing and revising—can be very beneficial for your 9th grade students, especially considering they are reading and writing below grade level. By integrating metacognitive strategies into your teaching, you can help students not only become more conscious of their writing processes but also develop crucial academic skills. Let’s apply the principles from your provided text to this goal.

  1. The Power of Metacognition in Editing and Revising

The essence of your question is how to boost your students’ ability to effectively edit and revise their writing using metacognitive skills. The text you provided highlights the burgeoning scientific understanding of the mind and its processes:

> “…understanding the mind—and the thinking and learning that the mind makes possible—has remained an elusive quest…”

To translate this into practical classroom strategies, focus on helping students understand their own mental processes while they write. Here’s a step-by-step strategy you might find useful:

  1. Strategy: Metacognitive Editing and Revising Logs
  1. Step 1: Introduce Metacognitive Concepts
    Begin by explaining metacognition to your students in simple terms—thinking about their thinking. For writing, this means being aware of how they choose words, structure sentences, and organize their thoughts.
  1. Step 2: Model the Process
    Choose a piece of writing and demonstrate the editing and revising process live. Think aloud as you make changes, explaining why you’re doing something. For example, “I’m changing this sentence because it doesn’t clearly express the main idea,” or “This paragraph lacks a topic sentence, so I need to add one.”
  1. Step 3: Student Practice with Guided Support
    Provide students with a piece of their own writing or a sample text. Ask them to keep a Metacognitive Editing and Revising Log where they will note:

- The changes they make (what they are editing/revising).
- The reasons for these changes (why they are making these edits/revisions).
- How they feel about the changes (reflect on the effectiveness).

For instance, a student might write:
- Change: “I added a topic sentence to my second paragraph.”
- Reason: “The paragraph was unclear and didn’t have a main idea.”
- Reflection: “Now, the paragraph is easier to understand.”

  1. Step 4: Reflect and Share
    Create opportunities for students to share their logs with peers, either in small groups or as a class discussion. Encourage them to explain their thought process and receive feedback. This step helps reinforce their learning and builds a community of practice.
  1. Why This Works
  1. Building Metacognitive Awareness
    Encouraging students to think about why they are making specific changes helps them become more conscious writers. They start understanding the purpose behind the writing rules and structures, rather than seeing them as arbitrary guidelines.
  1. Enhancing Engagement and Motivation
    When students see their peers actively engaging in similar struggles and triumphs, it fosters a sense of camaraderie. They become more motivated to participate and take risks in their writing.
  1. Developing Competence
    Over time, these strategies help students develop competence. They gain confidence in their ability to self-edit and revise, which is crucial for academic writing.
  1. Final Thoughts and Next Steps

Reflecting on your original question about how to “use metacognitive skills to teach the writing process,” specifically focusing on editing and revising, these steps can be tailored to your classroom. Try incorporating the Metacognitive Editing and Revising Log into your lessons and observe how it impacts your students’ engagement and literacy skills.

To further the discussion and refine your approach, consider revisiting the text you provided. Reading it again, you might find additional connections between the scientific understanding of learning processes and practical classroom strategies. Are there other areas within the text that discuss the development of competence or effective learning techniques that you could adapt for your students? The deeper your understanding, the more you can tailor these strategies to your unique classroom needs.

  1. Consider This

- What other metacognitive strategies have you tried, and how effective were they in engaging your students?
- Are there ways to integrate technology or multimedia to further enhance these metacognitive activities?
- How can you involve students in reflecting on the effectiveness of these strategies, possibly using their feedback for continuous improvement?

By continuously refining your approach and incorporating student feedback, you can create a dynamic and supportive learning environment that encourages growth and engagement for all your students.

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Jul 9

Let’s focus on the idea from Chapter 1, where the text says, “teachers must draw out and work with the preexisting understandings that their students bring with them.” This is essential for learning because if students’ initial understanding isn’t engaged, they might not fully grasp new concepts.

  1. Practical Application for First Grade:

Activity: “K-W-L Chart” (Know, Want to know, Learned)

1. Know: Start by asking your students what they already know about a topic. For instance, if you’re beginning a lesson on animals, ask them to share what animals they know and what they know about those animals.
2. Want to Know: Next, encourage them to ask questions about what they want to learn regarding the topic. This step helps engage their curiosity and sets learning goals.
3. Learned: After the lesson, go back to the chart and discuss what they’ve learned. This reflection helps solidify new knowledge and connects it to their initial thoughts and questions.

Why It’s Important:
- This practice acknowledges students’ prior knowledge and builds upon it, making new information more relevant and easier to understand.
- It helps teachers to identify misconceptions early and address them directly.
- This method encourages active participation and keeps students engaged.

By implementing a K-W-L chart, you not only validate students’ preconceptions but also guide them through a metacognitive process of setting learning goals and reflecting on their learning, which is crucial for deep understanding.

  1. Questions for Reflection:
    - After rereading the text, how might you adapt these other theoretical ideas for first-grade class activities?
    - Can you think of additional ways to make students’ preexisting knowledge visible in your classroom?

I’d love to hear your thoughts on these questions!

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Jul 9

Absolutely, teaching in a fourth-grade classroom in a low-income setting provides unique opportunities to apply these foundational principles. Let’s take a closer look at a key point from the text:

> “Students come to the classroom with preconceptions about how the world works. If their initial understanding is not engaged, they may fail to grasp the new concepts and information that are taught, or they may learn them for purposes of a test but revert to their preconceptions outside the classroom” (pp. 14-15).

This highlights the importance of addressing and connecting with students’ existing knowledge. A practical classroom application might involve starting a new topic by having a “What We Think We Know” session. For example, before starting a science unit on ecosystems, you could ask students to share their ideas about what plants and animals need to survive. This can be done through a KWL chart (Know, Want to know, Learned).

  1. Practical Application:

Activity:
KWL Chart Creation

1. Know (K): Ask students to write or draw what they know about ecosystems, animals, and plants. Gather these preconceptions.
2. Want to Know (W): Have students express what they want to learn about ecosystems. This can encourage curiosity and engagement.
3. Learned (L): After completing the unit, review the chart and fill in what they have learned, directly addressing any misconceptions shown in the “Know” section.

  1. Why This Works:
    Engaging with students’ preconceptions helps in tailoring lessons that build on what they know and correct misunderstandings, leading to deeper learning and retention. It also makes their learning more relevant and meaningful, fostering a sense of connection and investment in their education.
  1. Importance:
    This method aligns with educational research which shows that learning is more effective when new information is connected to existing knowledge. It underscores the necessity of creating a learner-centered classroom that values students’ backgrounds and leverages them as assets.

Considering these thoughts, how could you incorporate students’ cultural and social backgrounds into your lesson plans to make the learning experience richer and more personalized for them?

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Jul 9

Certainly! Let’s turn some of these theoretical insights into practical classroom activities for your 2nd grade classroom.

  1. Chapter 1: Leveraging Students’ Preconceptions

Quote:
> “If their initial understanding is not engaged, they may fail to grasp the new concepts and information that are taught, or they may learn them for purposes of a test but revert to their preconceptions outside the classroom” (pp. 14-15).

Practical Activity:
Concept Mapping
- Materials Needed:
– Large sheets of paper or poster board
– Markers or crayons
– Sticky notes

- Activity:
Start a new unit by asking students to draw what they already know about the topic. For example, if you’re beginning a unit on plants, ask children to draw a plant and label its parts. Have them use sticky notes to add their thoughts on what plants need to grow. As the unit progresses, update the map with new knowledge, showing how original ideas evolved.

- Why Implement It?
This engages their pre-existing knowledge and visually shows the progression of their learning. This process helps students anchor new information to what they already know.

  1. Chapter 2: Developing Expertise

Quote:
> “Experts notice features and meaningful patterns of information that novices do not notice” (p. 36).

Practical Activity:
Pattern Recognition Games
- Materials Needed:
– Sets of cards or objects with different shapes, colors, and patterns

- Activity:
Create a ‘Pattern Detective’ game where students have to find and describe patterns. For instance, cards with different sequences of shapes or colors can be used, and students have to group them based on identified patterns. This could be a fun and interactive way for them to start noticing and talking about patterns.

- Why Implement It?
Encouraging students to recognize and articulate patterns helps them begin to think like ‘experts’ in their own way, enhancing their observational and critical thinking skills.

  1. Chapter 3: Effective Transfer

Quote:
> “Initial learning is essential for transfer” (p. 53).

Practical Activity:
Real-World Connections and Reflections
- Materials Needed:
– Storybooks or short articles
– Reflection Journals

- Activity:
After teaching a concept (like the life cycle of a butterfly), read a related storybook. Ask students to relate the events in the story to what they learned in class. They can draw or write in their reflection journals about how the story connects to the real-world learning.

- Why Implement It?
By connecting classroom learning to real-world situations, students are more likely to transfer their understanding across different contexts. It also integrates literacy skills with content knowledge.

  1. Inviting Reflection:

As you dive back into the text, how might you further adapt these ideas to account for the unique cultural and social perspectives of your students? Are there any particular preconceptions your students bring that could serve as a foundation for deeper learning?

Feel free to share your thoughts or adaptations!

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Jul 9

That’s a great question! Let’s dive into how the principles in this chapter can practically help you engage your 9th grade English students who are reading and writing below grade level.

One of the key ideas from the text is the focus on the processes of thinking and learning, as well as the development of competence. This can be translated into your classroom by creating lessons that actively involve students in metacognitive activities.

For instance, the text mentions:

“understanding the mind—and the thinking and learning that the mind makes possible—has remained an elusive quest, in part because of a lack of powerful research tools.”

You can take this idea and apply it by integrating activities that help students become aware of their own thinking processes while they read and write. Here’s a practical example:

Activity: Think-Aloud Strategy
- Select a short, engaging passage appropriate for 9th grade but not overly challenging.
- Model a think-aloud where you read the passage and verbalize your thoughts as you navigate through it. For example, “I wonder what this character is feeling right now. The author used the word ‘anguished’ which makes me think they are really struggling.”
- Ask students to practice this technique in pairs or small groups, reading and thinking aloud to each other. Provide sentence starters or thought prompts to help guide them.

Why This Works:
- Encourages active engagement with the text.
- Helps students develop awareness of comprehension strategies.
- Builds confidence as they recognize that struggling with understanding is a normal part of reading.

Important Concepts to Implement:
- Developing metacognition: Students learn to think about their thinking, which is crucial for deep understanding.
- Building a positive learning environment: Activities like think-alouds allow students to see that everyone grapples with complex texts, fostering a supportive classroom community.

To build on this, what activities or strategies have you tried already that help your students become more aware of their thought processes while reading or writing? How could you adapt these to further focus on developing their metacognitive skills?

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Jul 9

Hey there! I can see how the ideas presented in “How People Learn” could be quite rich for your high school Culinary Arts class. Let’s look at one specific suggestion from the text that could be bridged to your hands-on, project-based learning environment:

Quote:
“Students come to the classroom with preconceptions about how the world works. If their initial understanding is not engaged, they may fail to grasp the new concepts and information that are taught” (pp. 14-15).

Application:
Before diving into a new unit like “Baking Techniques,” you could start by asking students about their own experiences and thoughts on baking. Maybe have them share what they believe are the essential steps or common mistakes. Capture these preconceptions through a quick survey or group discussion.

Why Use This Approach:
Engaging students’ preconceptions can reveal misconceptions or gaps in their knowledge. It sets a baseline and ensures that everyone starts the new lesson knowing what’s expected and what needs to be learned or corrected.

Importance:
By addressing students’ initial understanding, you lay a strong foundation that can help achieve a deeper grasp of new concepts. This is especially critical in subjects like Culinary Arts where incorrect preconceptions (like the importance of precise measurements) could lead to real-world failures.

To deepen the learning, you might then have the students apply this revised understanding immediately in a hands-on activity. For instance, let them experiment with baking a simple recipe twice—once following their initial understanding and once using the corrected approach. This way they can clearly see (and taste!) the difference.

What do you think about using students’ preconceptions as a starting point for your lessons? Do you see other ways these theoretical ideas could be bridged into activities in your culinary arts classroom?

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Jul 8

Online teaching and learning is basically when you learn and attend classes over the Internet. You can watch videos, join live sessions, and do your assignments online, which allows greater flexibility for both the instructor and learner. Emergency remote teaching, though, is like a quick turnaround to online when something unexpected happens, like COVID-19.

It’s important to be intentional about online learning, which means planning it out carefully to make sure it helps you learn. This includes thinking about how to make it interesting for you and making sure that you have what you need to take part, like the right technology and support.
The assignment mentioned adding a photo but I am not sure how to do that on here.

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Jul 8

Fantastic, you’ve selected a highly relevant concept for your AP English Language and Composition class. Let’s keep digging into how you can draw out and work with pre-existing student understandings, which is at the core of your original question about applying ideas to a book like “Educated” by Tara Westover.

  1. Quoted Concept
    From Chapter 1 of “How People Learn”: “Students come to the classroom with preconceptions about how the world works… teachers must ‘draw out and work with the preexisting understandings that their students bring with them’” (pp. 14-15, 19).
  1. Practical Application to “Educated”
    Given the rich narrative and the complex themes present in “Educated,” you should start by tapping into the students’ existing knowledge about key themes such as education, family, and self-discovery. For instance, before beginning the book, engage your students in a discussion or a reflective free-write with questions such as:
    - “What preconceptions do you have about formal education and its value?”
    - “How has your family influenced your perspective on education?”
    - “What personal obstacles do you think can impact one’s educational journey?”

This approach anchors new learning in familiar territory, allowing students to connect personally with Tara Westover’s experiences and insights in “Educated.”

  1. Why It’s Important
    By focusing on students’ preconceptions, you ensure that their initial understanding is actively engaged. As noted in “How People Learn,” failing to connect new concepts with existing knowledge can result in superficial learning that doesn’t translate beyond the classroom. In the context of “Educated,” engaging pre-existing understandings helps students relate to Westover’s narrative deeply and thoughtfully.
  1. Further Concept Expansion
    From Chapter 3 of “How People Learn”: “Transfer begins with background knowledge, which means that background knowledge must be engaged, explored, challenged, and leveraged” (p. 62).
  1. Practical Application to “Educated”
    Leveraging the concept of transfer, connect the themes in “Educated” with previous texts or personal experiences your students have explored. After reading a section of the book, prompt them with comparative analysis questions, such as:
    - “Compare Tara Westover’s educational journey with that of a character from another book you’ve read. What similarities and differences can you identify?”
    - “In what ways do Tara’s experiences challenge or reinforce your views on the importance of self-education?”

These exercises encourage students to apply their background knowledge and create a bridge between various texts and their own lives, deepening their understanding and fostering critical analysis.

  1. Reflective Question
    As you ponder how to apply these educational psychology concepts to “Educated,” consider, “How can I create opportunities for students to link their preconceptions with the transformative journey of Tara Westover?” Reflect on the unique ways your students can draw parallels between their lives and the text, leading to richer, more nuanced interpretations.
  1. Invitation to Reflect
    Revisit these chapters from “How People Learn” and examine additional strategies to bring students’ preconceptions to the forefront. Can you integrate more activities that make their thinking visible, such as group discussions, thematic debates, or creative projects centered on the themes of the book? How can you adapt these approaches to meet the diverse needs and backgrounds of your students in the AP English classroom?

By continuously exploring these educational psychology principles and intertwining them with the themes of “Educated,” you’ll effectively draw out and build upon your students’ pre-existing understandings, guiding them toward deeper learning and insightful analysis. Keep experimenting, reflecting, and adapting—your students’ journey with “Educated” will be profoundly enriched by your thoughtful and innovative teaching strategies!

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Jul 8

Fantastic, you’ve selected a highly relevant concept for your AP English Language and Composition class. Let’s keep digging into how you can draw out and work with pre-existing student understandings, which is at the core of your original question.

  1. Quoted Concept
    From Chapter 1: “Students come to the classroom with preconceptions about how the world works… teachers must ‘draw out and work with the preexisting understandings that their students bring with them’” (pp. 14-15, 19).
  1. Practical Application
    Given your role, an effective method is through Socratic seminars. This allows students to voice their pre-existing understandings and debate them in a structured manner. Before diving into a new text or rhetorical concept, you could ask your students questions like:
    - “What do you know about the author’s historical context?”
    - “How do you think this context might influence the author’s writing?”
    - “What are your predictions about the themes or rhetorical strategies used in this text based on the title or first paragraph?”

This not only makes their preconceptions visible but also allows you to gauge their initial thoughts, providing a clear starting point for deeper learning.

  1. Why It’s Important
    Engaging students’ preconceptions ensures that new information is integrated into their existing knowledge framework. This approach aligns with the book’s assertion that without engaging initial understandings, “they may fail to grasp the new concepts” or revert to old ways of thinking (pp. 14-15).
  1. Further Concept Expansion
    From Chapter 3: “Transfer begins with background knowledge, which means that background knowledge must be engaged, explored, challenged, and leveraged” (p. 62).
  1. Practical Application
    To facilitate transfer, you can use comparative analysis. When introducing a new text, have students compare it to a previous text they’ve studied. This way, they can draw on their background knowledge to make sense of new material. For instance, you might ask:
    - “How does the rhetorical strategy in ‘Text A’ compare with the one used in ‘Text B’?”
    - “What similar themes can you identify, and how are they addressed differently?”

Such comparisons help students see patterns and deepen their understanding, fostering an ability to apply learned concepts across different contexts.

  1. Reflective Question
    As you revisit the concepts from the text, consider how you might adapt your instructional methods to better draw out pre-existing understandings. Ask yourself, “What are effective ways to reveal the depth and complexity of my students’ prior knowledge?”

Would incorporating more discussion-based activities, like Socratic seminars or comparative analyses, help in bringing those preconceptions to the forefront? Reflect on your classroom experiences and the specific needs of your students to decide on the best strategies.

  1. Invitation to Reflect
    Revisit these chapters from “How People Learn” and think about additional ways to implement these strategies. Could there be even more questions or activities to engage students’ preconceptions? How might you tailor these approaches to fit the unique dynamics of your AP English classroom?

By continuously exploring these connections and integrating these principles into your teaching, you’ll be able to draw out and build on your students’ pre-existing understandings effectively. Keep experimenting, reflecting, and adapting—your students will greatly benefit from your thoughtful approach to their learning journey!

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Jul 8

Great question! The text provides several insights that can be invaluable for teaching high school AP English Language and Composition. Let’s dive into one of the key ideas:

  1. Quoted Concept
    “[T]eachers must ‘draw out and work with the preexisting understandings that their students bring with them’” (p. 19).
  1. Practical Application
    In your classroom, you could start a new unit by first engaging students in a discussion or quick-write activity about what they already know or believe about the topic. For example, if you are about to start a unit on rhetorical analysis, ask students to share their thoughts on what makes a piece of writing persuasive. This can be in the form of a brainstorming session, where students can freely express their preconceptions before you guide them into the academic frameworks and models they’ll be studying.
  1. Why It’s Important
    By acknowledging and working with their preconceptions, you ensure that students are connected to the material on a personal level, which can facilitate deeper learning and understanding. This also allows you to identify and address any misconceptions right from the start, paving the way for more effective teaching and learning throughout the unit.
  1. Further Concept Expansion
    “The authors recommend that ‘superficial coverage of more topics be replaced with in-depth coverage of fewer topics’” (p. 20).
  1. Practical Application
    In terms of curriculum design for AP English, consider focusing on fewer key texts or authors but engaging in more profound, detailed analysis of these works. You could include activities like detailed rhetorical analysis essays or in-class debates focused on the themes and rhetorical strategies of the selected materials. This method reinforces deeper understanding and helps students organize their knowledge in meaningful ways.
  1. Why It’s Important
    Deep engagement with the material fosters better retention and allows students to transfer their learning to new contexts—a crucial skill for both the AP exam and their future academic endeavors.
  1. Reflective Question
    As you revisit the text, how might you further incorporate students’ pre-existing knowledge and emphasize depth over breadth in your teaching strategies? What methods do you find effective for drawing out and working with pre-existing student understandings?

Reflecting on these aspects will help you better bridge the gap between theory and practice in your classroom. Keep exploring and refining your approach—you’re doing great work!

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Jul 7

When asked what comes to mind when I hear “online teaching and learning,” I think of both the autonomous acquiring of knowledge in addition to a collaborative effort between educators, institutions, families, and learners.

I have only been teaching for four years now, and my first year of teaching was during the COVID-19 pandemic. I was hired as a second grade teacher in 2019, excited to move to a new city, start working in a school, and learn everything I could to be a great teacher. Then COVID-19 hit. While I was still required to relocate, everything needed to be done remotely. I feel incredibly fortunate that the school system I worked for was extremely organized and on top of remote learning. I was also lucky that my team and co-teacher were amazing. I am still close to my old co-workers to this day and we still support in each other with in-person education strategies. My experience was not able to shift because my first experience was remote. Going back in person was another learning experience for me.

Our faculty provided consistent team meetings via zoom, and lots of class-specific support meetings as well. My co-teacher and I were in constant communication overlooking the classwork our students were completing, creating interactive material and lesson plans, role playing lessons, and testing out zoom features our students could use.

Online education was relatively new at the time for my school as a means of learning. Students were sent chromebooks to use and the already created curriculum had to be adapted accordingly. Originally, the fully online design was more similar to emergency remote teaching, since no one knew how long the pandemic would last or when we would return to in-person schooling. As it became clear we would remain remote, we shifted to an online-learning mentality.

My personal definition of online teaching and learning is: the adaptation of course material to be interacted with online in an engaging and useful manner. I am not 100% sure how to add a picture but here is a link to an animated bitmoji banner my co-teacher and I created for our google classroom!
https://drive.google.com/file/d/1jYxKW_gyPzhKiFPxg2KuOrRCpt_RYjF_/view?usp=sharing

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Jul 7

Online teaching and learning encompass the delivery of educational content, communication, and interaction via the internet, fostering flexible and accessible learning opportunities irrespective of geographical boundaries. It involves the use of various technologies like video conferencing, learning management systems, and interactive media to facilitate instruction, collaboration, and assessment. At its core, online teaching and learning adapts traditional educational practices to the digital age, offering both challenges and opportunities for personalized learning experiences and skill development in a global context.

The shift to remote learning during the COVID-19 pandemic profoundly transformed my understanding and experience of online learning. Initially, it highlighted the necessity and potential of digital platforms in maintaining educational continuity amidst disruptions. As I adapted to virtual classrooms and asynchronous learning environments, I gained a deeper appreciation for the flexibility and accessibility that online learning can provide. It also underscored the importance of robust digital infrastructure and supportive learning tools for effective engagement and communication. Moreover, navigating the challenges of online assessments and maintaining student engagement further broadened my perspective on the diverse methods and technologies that can enhance learning outcomes in virtual settings. Overall, the pandemic accelerated my recognition of online learning as a viable and evolving educational modality with its own unique advantages.

The difference between emergency remote learning and traditional online teaching and learning formats lies primarily in their intent, preparation, and execution. emergency remote learning, as experienced during the COVID-19 pandemic, was a rapid response to an unforeseen crisis, necessitating a quick transition from in-person to remote instruction without adequate time for comprehensive planning or training. It often relied on existing technologies and tools available to educators at short notice, aiming primarily to maintain educational continuity rather than fully replicate the structured, pedagogically designed approach of traditional online learning. In contrast, traditional online teaching and learning formats are meticulously planned and designed with clear learning objectives, incorporating instructional strategies tailored for online delivery. They leverage purpose-built platforms, instructional design principles, and ongoing support for both educators and students to ensure effective engagement, assessment, and interaction in virtual environments. While emergency remote learning served its immediate purpose during crises, traditional online teaching and learning formats offer a more robust framework for sustained and effective digital education.

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Jul 7

The difference between online learning (OL) and emergency remote teaching (ERT) is preparation and design. OL courses, whether synchronous or asynchronous, are planned: resources curated, schedules made, assignments created, LMS training, etc. They can also be adjusted each time the course is taught, to make it a more effective course.
ERT is more akin to the newly certified teacher stepping into their own classroom for the first time. The walls are bare, there’s no textbooks, and no cooperating teacher to help guide you. You are left to reinvent the wheel. On top of that, many of your students have no experience being in a classroom.

My anecdotal experience with ERT during the Covid-19 pandemic, is that instructors and learners were thrown into a platform for learning, that they were largely unfamiliar with.
Instead of the flow of an organized, well planned course, students got disjointed activities, making learning feel like a chore rather than an exploration of the content.
Instructors who teach in-person need plans in place for ERT. It is important that institutions provide these instructors with OL course design experts, who can give them advice on designing ERT content for an existing in-person course. In-person lessons can be quickly adapted for synchronous/asynchronous learning, with the right tools and pedagogy.

I certainly agree with the authors of the text, that ERT is a different beast from OL. ERT Will become another pedagogical area of study for learning design.

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Jul 7

In my personal journey with online teaching and learning I can remember the intense frustration of emergency remote teaching (ERT). Particularly being an art teacher, this proved to be a daunting task as I did not know of what materials students had at home and by what means they could work on/complete assignments. I feel as though with all things, it takes time to understand and adapt to different intricacies when it comes to online teaching/learning.
I would say the distinction between ERT and online learning is that one was more or less thrusted upon the academic and learner where as online learning has flexibility for growth without the intense pressure of creating lessons to meet constricted timelines (in my experience). Also, pulling in from the previous reading from the History and State of Distance Education, studies have shown the positive data to asynchronous learning vs synchronous learning in a distance education context. When I was in ERT during the pandemic, students were expected to meet via zoom for specific times during the day which proved to be stressful and unobtainable.
Moreover, distance education is more conducive to adult learners then younger learners. As I was working with children 5-13 years of age during the pandemic, they did not have the same capacity for online learning as an adult learner would. Now, if they had the time and resources before being thrust into an emergency response form of learning, like that of online learning, I think the data and completion of assignments would have been very different.
Although the pandemic was a difficult time in adapting to a ERT way of working, I do feel as though it pushed me to find new ways of using technology within my art pedagogy which I might not have done had COVID not taken place.

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Jul 6

I have never taught online. Instead, I was an instructor who attempted to facilitate Emergency Remote Learning (ERT) for a lab-based course for two summers during the COVID pandy. The distinction between ERT and true online teaching is considerable. That is not to say that I took this responsibility lightly or grossly failed to plan the instruction, I simply lacked the time and tools to do it real justice, especially knowing what I know now in terms of the instructional design process. Also, as a side note, outside stressors including the health and safety of all individuals involved, greatly impacted the 30,000-foot perspective on the situation: is learning (under these circumstances) how to distinguish dependent vs. independent variables on a scatter plot, for example, even important when you’re a student who’s afraid to go to a family event for fear of getting sick? Or, possibly even worse, not being able to visit a hospital-bound grandparent due to visitor restrictions? Being in academia I obviously view education as invaluable; however, as a human I realize that you have nothing if you don’t have your health or the feeling of safety and stability. Needless to say, the term “emergency” definitely fits the circumstances surrounding the COVID ERT epidemic.

On the contrary, building a successful “learning ecosystem” as described by Hodges, et. al. (2020) requires careful instructional design planning and development using a systematic model (pick one!); it’s NOT simply online content delivery. This learning ecosystem should intentionally incorporate the Nine Dimensions of Learning, choosing the best options within each dimension, for the greatest effectiveness. I appreciated the line stating, “careful planning for online learning includes not just identifying the content to cover but also carefully tending to how you’re going to support different types of interactions that are important in the learning process” (Hodges et.al., 2020). This, again, emphasizes that content delivery is NOT enough! Addressing the fact that learning is both cognitive and social is a crucial element to planning instruction that supports the following interactions: student-student, student-content, and student-instructor.

I endorse the definition that [good] online education is a robust ecosystem that fully integrates and supports the cognitive and social aspects of learning, not just a hierarchical transmission of information from teacher to student. It requires full and active participation from instructor and learners alike, which in actuality, is not very different from [good] traditional face-to-face education. Good education, whether in person or online, requires abundant resources, careful planning, and participation.

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Jul 6

On the surface, when I hear “online teaching and learning,” I think of online courses that are administered to students by an instructor, all separated by space and time. I picture the instructor, let’s say a college professor, sitting in their office on a university campus, creating Powerpoints, grading assignments, and responding to student inquiries via email. I picture the students, counties or states away, in their homes, work offices, or local libraries, reading the materials assigned by the instructor, and engaging with other students via discussion board posts. This is probably what many other people picture when they hear “online teaching and learning,” as well.

However, I’ve come to realize that online teaching and learning involves a complex process of design, implementation, and evaluation. It’s not as simple as taking an in-person curriculum, plugging it into a learning management system, and expecting success. Also, online teaching and learning is not just limited to higher education, and the COVID-19 pandemic opened our eyes to that. As companies shifted to remote workforces, and elementary and secondary schools closed their doors, corporate trainers and schoolteachers had to learn how to adapt to online teaching. In turn, students and working professionals had to adapt to learning online.

The COVID-19 pandemic set a new precedent for online teaching and learning. Perhaps now, instructors and institutions are realizing that online learning and teaching is a permanent part of the learning experience. Because emergency remote learning was a quick response to an acute global emergency, there were bound to be hiccups. However, now that remote education is becoming a norm, instructors and institutions are coming to understand how to facilitate online education to make it equally as successful as more traditional formats.

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Jul 4
Online Teaching and Learning

When I think of “online teaching and learning”, I think of a structured educational experience conducted primarily or entirely through digital platforms including lectures, discussions, assignments and assessments that are delivered digitally.
The format can be synchronous or asynchronous and it can be through LMS, video conferencing and interactive multimedia.

The difference between “Emergency Remote learning” vs. More traditional Online
teaching and learning formats.

The shift to remote learning during the COVID-19 pandemic highlighted for me the distinction between emergency remote teaching and traditional online teaching. The first characteristic of the emergency remote learning was the clear lack of preparation as a consequence of the requirement of a rapid response to maintain continuity during the crisis. The focus was on a quick deployment of remote instruction without the typical planning and support structures of traditional online courses. Another unexpected outcome was that lack of training was evident since instructors were forced to record themselves giving a lecture, and when we watched such videos, it was clear that the teacher was struggling to keep the instruction going using a platform they were clearly not familiar with.
In addition, there were not enough student engagement strategies and communication between instructor and students was poor.

On the other hand online teaching is about leveraging technology to facilitate educational outcomes in a flexible and accessible manner. It involves thoughtful instructional design, clear communication, and robust support mechanisms for students to engage with content and each other, regardless of physical location. Based on my background and experience, Cyber Schools are good examples of organized online education because they are built to provide instruction based on technology and teachers are trained to conduct lectures with strategies to promote the acquisition of knowledge and promote engagements during live sessions.

When I decided to switch my kids from the emergency online instruction the school district was providing to a cyber school, I could clearly experience first hand the difference between emergency remote learning vs. more traditional online teaching and learning formats.

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Jul 2

“Due to the threat of COVID19” is a phrase that stopped me in my tracks, made me dizzy from the speed at which my eyes sought the date of this article and then just for a moment allowed me to indulge in the nostalgia of what many people I know call the Before Times. Emergency Remote teaching will never be the same as what students experienced in the spring of 2020. The content that was offered bears no resemblance to a well-planned intentional remote teaching curriculunm, with ALL due respect to anyone who taught through it. From the experience of the students in my home, teachers had little to no chance of success in the K-12 environment when they found themselves competing for the attention of students who suddenly had all the distractions of the internet at their fingertips on school-issued Chromebooks, the same students who weeks earlier might have had their personal cell phones confiscated if used in class. Online learning has emerged from it’s ‘lesser than’ status, become more mainstream and strengthened it’s core principles since COVID19. As many more educators have been exposed to online learning concepts either through continuing education or professional development, the word emergency can shift from the panic and danger connotation to the gentler arising from need.

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Jul 2

Since I have not had the opportunity to teach online yet I will post from an online learner’s perspective. In my work life in Marketing Technology, I have had the opportunity to experience extremely high quality online learning. It’s rare these days for companies to spend money to send their staff offsite for classroom learning when a recorded webinar or a guided third party learning path may achieve the same objective without seriously impacting work schedules. Even our instructor-led classes are online. All my company’s required HR classes are extremely engaging and well-produced, with professional production quality and interactive experiences that reinforce learning for multiple types of learners. Evaluations are built into the process as well. So, for me, the definition of online learning is participating in well-planned and well-orchestrated digital learning experiences, either synchronously or asynchronously, that utilize the same pedagogical principles used in classroom teaching but bring with them all the added benefits of technology, breadth of resources and connectedness.

During the Covid-19 Pandemic both of my children switched to Emergency Remote Learning. Because I work from home, I had the opportunity to observe their online classes as well as hear about their experiences with remote learning from their perspectives. Unfortunately, the default delivery mechanism tended to be Zoom lectures, and both of my kids were bored and unengaged, as well as consumed with feelings of isolation. As was stated in the article, carefully planned online teaching processes were absent in what my children were experiencing. Teachers were just trying to get the job done and were struggling to simply operate Zoom, let alone fold in any online experiences that were not part of their original course design.

So, my experience and perspective about online learning has not necessarily changed – I have always known how expansive and effective it could be. What has changed since Covid-19 is my perspective on school readiness for operating in an online environment during an emergency. Covid has taught us that we cannot take the status quo for granted. Teachers should be designing their classroom courses to include varied delivery methods; they should already be integrating digital online experiences into classroom teaching. Connectedness is key for active learning, whether students are sitting in the same classroom or on a Zoom call. We need to learn from the past and be open to new ways of working in the future.

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Jul 2

I believe this encompasses the main idea of this text. No one is all knowing, there is so much to learn, but you have to be open to it. Metacognition…

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Jul 2

This phrase provoked me…as an educator to want to find ways in which I can create hands on and engaging lessons for my students that deepen their understanding, so that students have this automatic and fluent retrieval of information. I think this shows their thorough understanding on an area.

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Jul 2

This was one of my responses as well. I understand strictly grading on if students follow a method taught to get an answer like in math courses, however students may have alternative methods to solving different problems or have varying answers to situations, so how can there always be a clear right answer? and should there be? I feel as though this limits creativity and deeper level learning as students only focus on getting it right compared to truly understanding and being able to use that method in other contexts.

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