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The Descriptive Review of a Child Protocol


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The Descriptive Review of a Child Protocol

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Jun 25
Emily W (Jun 25 2020 3:48PM) : As you read through the protocol and its description, we invite you to consider the following question: How is this process different or similar to the ways in which you (or others) have encountered, observed, and described students? [Edited]
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Aug 10
Lu m (Aug 10 2020 11:56PM) : Under what circumstance do we use this protocol? 90 minutes is a long time. It's not realistic that we do it for every students. My parent teacher conference is 15 min for each child.
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Aug 20
Jessica A (Aug 20 2020 9:02PM) : Lu- that was one thought I had. Ninety minutes?!! It sounds great in theory, but 90 minutes?
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Sep 3
Jonathan P (Sep 03 2020 5:34PM) : I totally agree. more

90 minutes is exorbitant. Most research shows that a person’s attention span lasts about 15 minutes.

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Aug 2
Harriet F (Aug 02 2021 4:43PM) : 90 minutes set aside to discuss a child more

If we think about the “typical” IEP conference, 90 minutes is not unusual. Maybe what this protocol reminds us to consider is that all children may need the equivalent of an individualized education plan.

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Jul 22
Paul A

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(Jul 22 2022 3:54PM) : Too often IEP's are created with deficit models of children. The Descriptive Review of a Child helps us to keep looking and looking for what the child can do... is doing... well.
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Jul 23
Karyn F (Jul 23 2022 10:04PM) : IEP more

When learning about the IEP’s we were told to focus on the child strengths and how we can use that to help support the student.

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Jul 22
Regina O (Jul 22 2022 12:13PM) : Lu m, I believe this protocol is to be used during a n IEP conference or to evaluate a child for additional services because it includes a complete description of the child as well as many other school staff. more

The use of protocol is very effective ant time efficient because it reduces the waste of time in an issue and it also restrict those people who take over a meeting and would not let other speak. To me, this appears to be a meeting for a possible child who needs extra social, behavioral, or academic, physical, or support.

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Jul 23
Karyn F (Jul 23 2022 10:02PM) : The protocol is used to help who? more

It appears to me also that the protocol is for a child who needs extra social, behavioral, academic, physical support. Which i think mainly still holds true but after discussing with peers it seems to be able to benefit all students at some point. This is because when you are able to provide the kind of support a student needs you may find that it also helps others.

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Aug 28
Jessica A (Aug 28 2020 9:36PM) : How is this process different or similar to the ways in which you (or others) have encountered, observed, and described students? more

As a professional who has worked in various capacities with young children and adolescents both inside and outside of the classroom, the process helps us focus on the student in a way that explains a lot about who they are, and where they come from and what we can do as professionals to better help students reach their educational, emotional and social goals. In fact, many of the questions listed under “Description of Child” (par.26-30)are questions we would utilize in order to describe the student’s characteristics and progress.

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Jul 18
Marlen A (Jul 18 2022 5:31PM) : I find this process similar to the way my teachers had explain how to develop a lesson plan
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Sep 8
Zedica D (Sep 08 2020 4:01PM) : Usually professionals would present and leave the clarifying/probing questions until the end. By doing this you allow the rest of the information in the presentation to possibly address any questions/concerns the audience may have.
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Sep 9
Karen M (Sep 09 2020 8:39PM) : Describing students more

As I read through this protocol, I associated it to the idea of “teaching a child as a whole”. As an aspiring teacher, it is interesting to see the different questions and answers educators can use or document for each student. Speaking from experience as a parent, I have never encountered this protocol and I agree with Lu M. about the very brief parent teacher conferences.

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Sep 23
Aimee Grace E (Sep 23 2020 5:15AM) : This protocol is different for me through my observation because i have heard students being described based on the behaviors and actions they display. It has been rare to hear a teacher explain the reason they might act is because of such and such. more

Let us do this to fix it. I tend to hear how much trouble they cause in class as well to the teacher process.

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Jul 18
Marlen A (Jul 18 2022 5:35PM) : I agree with you, Aimee. We have to consider teachers' implicit bias when they have to present a child. It is important to see from which point of view the children are presented.
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Jul 18
Diana L (Jul 18 2022 7:43PM) : I couldn't agree more with you! more

Many teachers tend to see bad behavior in a student when they are not properly seating with their hands crossed on top of the table and instead they are moving around and being talkative. Most time students who do this have underlying reasons that are dismissed or seen as they have a problem when in reality students have too much energy. Sometimes students get bored very easily when not engaged or they already know what is being taught. As educators we must first observe, assess and ask questions without assuming because a child’s actions always have a based reason for their behaviors and this too could be home related.

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Jul 22
Regina O (Jul 22 2022 12:39PM) : Describing and labeling a child are different and this protocol is to be used to describe the student general school behavior only. more

I understand your point, but great teachers only tell, exactly what they observe" on the child and let evaluators label the causes of the behavior as well as strategies to resolve, reduced or change them. What do you think?

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Jul 23
Karyn F (Jul 23 2022 10:14PM) : Bad behavior doesn't mean a bad kid. Most of the time bad behavior is a sign of an unmet need. I can imagine we all know some teachers from our past or present that could have used this protocol.
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Jul 23
Regina O (Jul 23 2022 10:49PM) : Protocols are used during a meeting that needs to be well planed and time efficient. more

A school principal would never use a protocol to observe a teacher, he/she may use a protocol after the observation meeting.

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Jul 22
Regina O (Jul 22 2022 12:57PM) : This process is different in which I observe and describe students because it involves other people observations and the meeting is well structured and timed.
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Jul 22
Christal P (Jul 22 2022 4:20PM) : How is this process similar/different? more

This process is individualized, very in-depth, involves numerous collaborators from the child’s community, and is also highly structured. Similar to what happens when a child is being considered for services to ensure a plan of success. However, this is for every child.

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Jul 22
Regina O (Jul 22 2022 12:28PM) : Any educator who would like to use time wisely must use a protocol during a meeting, otherwise he/she may run into running out of time and getting nowhere. more

The Descriptive Review of a Child Protocol" is a great tool to be implemented during meetings and especially in a one that includes creating a profile that covers the social, academic, and behavior of a child. Just imagine a child who behaves very well with some teachers, unacceptable with other teachers, and the parents feel the child is an outstanding students. Each party in the meeting will argue to create a child profile. This is very time consuming and this protocol will meet the needs of the presenter and facilitator.

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Adapted by Katy Kelly from “Making the Whole Student Visible: The Descriptive Review of a Child”, HORACE, 11/1996 – a process developed by Pat Carini at the Prospect Center in Bennington, Vermont for reflecting on students and their work.

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Jul 18
Jesse B (Jul 18 2022 5:46PM) : There's a personal connection here for me. I went to Bennington for my undergraduate studies! Funny enough, I never took a single education class. I spent most of my time in the music building. more

This activity seems as though it could really be a valuable one for building an educational community not only within school walls but also in the home.

To get parents to be able to think about their child through this educational and personal lens would be incredibly valuable. That is if, of course, the family had the time and resources to dedicate to this activity.

I suppose extra time is becoming more rare these days, especially among families in urban settings. As an aside, neither Bennington college, nor its educational center, are in urban settings. Very much the opposite.

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The Prospect Archive and Center for Education and Research in North Bennington, Vermont, has, over many years, developed the concept of “Descriptive Review of the Child.” The work done by these dedicated educators has seeded a dialogue about children’s work all across the country that deserves gratitude and acknowledgement.

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Aug 2
Jen R (Aug 02 2021 1:21AM) : My son went to an elementary school where descriptive review was the centerpiece. All the teachers were trained at this center. The deep knowledge they had of my child was evident. more

We got 3 page narrative reports instead of report cards. His 2nd grade teacher had him read to us at a family conference and explained exactly what literacy skills he had (intonation, decoding, etc). She knew his interests and how to engage him, who he chose to work with at work time, and his specific strengths and challenges. All of the teachers in the school collaborated and learned about each child so that there was continuity as they progressed through the years. I had never seen anything like it. It was amazing.

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Aug 2
Oluwatoyin I (Aug 02 2021 4:41PM) : the descriptive review of a child more

During most of my fieldwork observations I constantly saw the process teachers used actually providing a full descriptive review of each child. Each parent is given an individual narrative of their child interest and strengths as well as what need to be improved on. Teachers taking the time to build upon each individual characteristics of students they worked with and not a general blank report card.

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Aug 2
Harriet F (Aug 02 2021 4:46PM) : What school is this? more

Is this a private school? How many children per class?

This underscores the difference between the “haves” and the “have nots.” EVERY child deserves this amount of attention.

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Aug 3
Jen R (Aug 03 2021 9:14AM) : My son's school was a public school (Central Park East 1) and class sizes were standard. more

However, it was very small (about 200 kids) and teachers (including specials, paraprofessionals, special ed and intervention teachers, and counselors) collaborated across grades so they got to know kids over time. There was a lot of time for staff collaboration. They were very creative about scheduling and dividing classes for music, art and movement to allow for small group work and support.

Beyond that, I think the progressive curriculum and pedagogy was crucial for allowing this attention. The curriculum was emergent and inquiry-based. The center of every day was a 2 hour block of “work time” in which kids chose their activity area and developed their own projects and interests. Because students were directing their learning in so many ways, this allowed teachers to spend a lot of time observing. Literacy was woven through this work time as kids kept work time journals. There was a lot of focus on social-emotional growth, which yields big dividends as kids get older and are able to take more responsibility for their work. The school had an 80% opt-out rate from the standardized tests, which also freed teachers from having to “teach to the test” and there was a lot of buy-in to alternative assessments and a more holistic understanding of the child.

I think all of this helped. But it IS very challenging still to do all this with the large class sizes and small budgets of a public school. It’s really made possible by a teaching staff and parent body that is committed to the model. But for it to really scale system-wide, I do think it would require smaller class sizes and far more professional support than teachers usually receive. These are the kinds of schools rich families choose for their own children, but then they tell us that the rest of us needs skills-driven, test-driven, “no-excuses” schools. I agree that every child deserves this amount of attention and to be treated as an individual rather than a product to which we are expected to “add value”.

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Jul 19
Jennifer V (Jul 19 2022 10:44AM) : This school sounds amazing! more

Wow, I want to be a teacher at this school! Learning how to observe and understand the whole child and focusing on their strengths to support them through challenges is key.

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Jul 23
Karyn F (Jul 23 2022 10:19PM) : I wonder if any middle/high school has been able to provide this kind of individualized narrative instead of report cards.
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Jul 22
Alexis A (Jul 22 2022 4:06PM) : These types of works are the ones that make teachers to focus in specific factors to help students better in fulfilling their needs.
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This process is not intended to solve a problem or change a child, rather it allows us to know her better — and as a result use that knowledge to better meet her academic, social, or physical needs.

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Jun 25
Emily W (Jun 25 2020 3:51PM) : This protocol has continued to appear "radical" to some educators. Why do you think, after nearly 30-years, this protocol is considered radical and new?
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Jul 29
Jessica C (Jul 29 2020 5:39PM) : The US tends to have a "quick-fix" mentality to make problems go away asap. Getting to know a child takes time and runs counter to the idea of making bad things go away quickly.
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Jul 29
Amanda G (Jul 29 2020 11:19PM) : Well said, Jessica. [Edited]
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Aug 20
Jessica A (Aug 20 2020 9:27PM) : While I tend to agree with you about the "quick-fix" mentality especially utilized in this country, I still do believe that this protocol helps the teacher observe and take note of each student individually as opposed to not. more

As I read through the protocol it encouraged me to think about each student individually and take note of some things that we tend to take for granted sometimes like their physical presence, their gestures, their relationships with other children and adults, activities and interests etc. This all helps guide teachers get to know our students better and also helps us in differentiating instruction

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Sep 23
Aimee Grace E (Sep 23 2020 4:24AM) : That is very true and like you said they take away the idea of the students being the problem when they are unable to learn how they teacher wants them to but add they work for the teacher to figure out what best way to assiste the students.
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Jul 29
Amanda G (Jul 29 2020 11:26PM) : In addition to Jessica's response. Unfortunately, there are some close-minded educators that believe they have "seen" this behavior before in their years of experience. Instead of getting to know this specific child, they revert to past efforts.
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Jul 30
Jessica C (Jul 30 2020 5:23PM) : Good point, Amanda. Teachers need to be curious about their students, not just presume they know everything.
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Sep 20
Zachary M (Sep 20 2020 12:51PM) : Truly Understanding and Knowing Our Students more

As teachers, it is our duty to act not only as content deliverers or authority figures but also as collaborative role models. We must have the willingness to work with students who come from various backgrounds. The only way that we can do this is by getting to know our students. By doing this, it shows our students that we are caring and empathetic individuals. This in turn fosters a stronger teacher-student bond.

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Sep 23
Aimee Grace E (Sep 23 2020 4:30AM) : very true, the students we meet today are not the same as students teachers had back in the day and i honestly think as time changes, as our students needs changes and so do we as teacher need to adapt to it. more

I believe it to be fun to get to know your students because like Zachary was saying it creates relationship and where there is relationship there tends to be a mutual goal or agreement that facilitate things for both parties. Teachers knows the students ang gets to share the lesson in a way is more understandable instead of feeling hopeless when lesson is being taught and students do not understand. While students see the effort and respect have for their learning experience and tends to be more collaborative.

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Jul 23
Christal P (Jul 23 2022 2:25AM) : I think to make the biggest impact for students, teachers need to focus on building genuine connection and understanding. more

Getting to know the child better really allows us to individualize instruction to tend to all their needs and better support their growth. Having effective engagement and communication all stems from the relationship we build with children. When I step into a new space with a new group of student, I always focus on trying to build trust, relationship, and understanding so that can open up communication and facilitate planning.

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Aug 1
Ifeoma E (Aug 01 2020 4:56AM) : I do agree with you, Amanda, every behavior has an antecedent, which can’t be the same for every student adopting one size fits all approach in addressing a behavior is a recipe for failure.
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Aug 11
Lesley T (Aug 11 2020 1:13AM) : It is very easy for teachers to relate one experience they had with every student. This boxes in students and doesn't give space for the teacher to get to know the student as an individual
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Aug 5
Emmie S (Aug 05 2020 11:12PM) : I think while this may not be a new concept teacher must take into account a lot more about the children than what they are simply seeing in the classroom to truly understand and get a full and accurate picture of their students.
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Aug 11
Lesley T (Aug 11 2020 1:15AM) : Good point Emmie. A lot of my professor discuss getting to know the student outside of the classroom. There is much that can effect a student and make the student who they are. You have to learn about each student.
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Jul 22
Alexis A (Jul 22 2022 4:20PM) : Im agree with you, in order for the teacher to have a better understanding, and help the student better, it should take this into account.
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Aug 11
Lesley T (Aug 11 2020 1:12AM) : Yes. I agree with Jessica. It is a very traditional approach to just look at the student's grades to paint a picture of who the student is.
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Sep 8
Zedica D (Sep 08 2020 4:04PM) : It may seem radical because it does not try to correct or change anything in the child or the child's behavior. Instead, it focuses on getting to know the child.
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Sep 23
Aimee Grace E (Sep 23 2020 4:32AM) : very true, it takes away the image of problem and sees the child for who they are and what their needs are. I really like thid concept
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Sep 9
Karen M (Sep 09 2020 8:47PM) : Radical and new more

It is unbelievable to hear that educators still view this protocol as radical and new. Knowing our students is an essential part in ensuring their success. What comes to mind is that this protocol might be difficult to comply in schools that are understaffed, under-funded, or that my have an overflowing student population.

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Jul 18
Jesse B (Jul 18 2022 5:59PM) : Yes, I agree. Under resourced communities will inevitably have difficulty implementing this type of approach, despite it seeming quite sound from a theoretical and social-emotional standpoint.
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Sep 23
Aimee Grace E (Sep 23 2020 4:21AM) : Why is it radical? more

In my opinion it is radical because it is not in the norms of how the school system in America do things. I believe that in the school system, they see children as people who they need to fix to become better citizens. In my opinion, students are there to only absorbe what the teacher displays and that is about it. Taking the time to know the student is radical because it kind of take over the control of teacher knows it all and the information they feed is necessary for the student. What it means now is the needs of the students are important and so teacher have to know it to better assist them, which is completely different to how things were been done in traditional school system.

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Jul 12
Ayaan S (Jul 12 2020 12:01AM) : This protocol is necessary and deemed important especially by public health officials as it provides a solid foundation shaped to meet the specific needs of each child. Have you seen this protocol implemented by educators?
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Jul 23
Karyn F (Jul 23 2022 10:23PM) : I've taken more than a handful of education classes and this is the first time I've heard about it. Well, I guess in theory I have learned something like it in a special education course. I'm kind of shocked that it was never mentioned.
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Sep 3
Jonathan P (Sep 03 2020 5:36PM) : Understanding a student is pivotal to enhances their probability of success in the academic sphere.
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Aug 2
Khurram A (Aug 02 2021 4:39PM) : Like with most ideals in education, their is no one fix solution, the best we can do is gather more tools to help understand our students better.
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Aug 2
mirseda K (Aug 02 2021 4:42PM) : I totally agree more

I agree with the idea that first educators need to know their students before trying to solve any problem. I observed that some teachers put a name on their students without knowing them, or why their behavior is like that. I believe in a restorative circle as a way to talk and to create that relationship with our students, educators, parents, where we give the possibility to our students to express themselves. In this way, we learn about their needs.

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Aug 29
Aniya M (Aug 29 2021 4:34PM) : Changing a Child vs. Knowing a Child more

In past experiences, I have seen teachers attempt to re-build a child accrording to what they feel the child lacks and needs. While setting goals for students in terms of their behavior and academics, is not bad, nevertheless, getting to know the student allows us to better tailor our lessons and help them benefit the most from them.

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Jul 18
Marlen A (Jul 18 2022 5:14PM) : I believe it is important to know each child to understand the situations that intersect in children's lives and have negative outcomes.
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Jul 18
Emily S (Jul 18 2022 5:54PM) : Love this. more

I have read Pat Carini’s work in various education classes over the past four years or so, and every time I reread this protocol, I have to appreciate how rooted in observation it is. We are so used to hearing things like, “Johnny’s a bad kid” or “Riley is so smart”, but what does that really mean? This process seeks to address some need a student has by gaining a better understanding of that child through observation. We become scientists looking for evidence, and our own biases should hopefully be left at the door.

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Jul 24
Claudia S (Jul 24 2022 9:30AM) : The descriptive review of a child protocol more

The descriptive review of a child protocol is created this process is created to target, identify, and work on the child’s needs to better provide the services students need.
Through this process a child can receive support in many areas in which development t needs to be reinforced.

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Jul 25
Stephanie M (Jul 25 2022 10:32AM) : The descriptive review of a child. more

Teachers needs to understand that there are many students in a classroom, which all have different needs. 90 minutes is not enough to assume something. However, there are many teachers that do not want to get updated. They believe that their old method is just the right one. However, things have changed.

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Time (see facilitation tips) Allow at least 90 minutes for the process and plan on pre-conferencing several days prior to the conference to allow participants time to reflect on the child and prepare their description. Times given below are guidelines only based on a 90-minute conference – they should be reviewed carefully in every pre-conference.

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Process (see attached notes for details of each step)

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Jun 25
Emily W (Jun 25 2020 3:48PM) : Which of these steps seem most valuable in ensuring that teachers attend to students with respect and care?
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Aug 2
Juanita M (Aug 02 2020 6:39PM) : Of all these steps doing the pre-conference is extremely valuable. Most teacher is very busy and sometimes may not give each child the proper amount of time to reflect on that child. And not just reflect on only their weaknesses but also their strengths.
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Sep 8
Zedica D (Sep 08 2020 4:06PM) : Description of the child because reading from notes ensures that there was an actual observation completed. It is important for teachers to observe students and their behavior so that they can see the what triggered the behavior and what was able to more

settle the child down after the fact.

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Aug 2
Priscilla A (Aug 02 2021 4:54PM) : Description of a child more

Description of the child is very essential because teachers use observation to share updates on the child’s progress while also addressing any thoughts or questions from parents. It assists educators in better understanding why a child may exhibit challenging behaviors.

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Sep 23
Aimee Grace E (Sep 23 2020 4:49AM) : Description of child and pop ups. more

I believe the description of the child is very important because it just show the students that their teachers knows about them, instead of them being labeled as student A or B, this takes into consideration who they are hence making the student feel valued and cared for. I also think pop ups are important because it is like an overview of basically what did the child said and repeating to assure the point was sharing clearly across and it is also another way to show the student that you heard them and take it into consideration.

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Jul 12
Ayaan S (Jul 12 2020 12:04AM) : These steps are crucial in attaining the child's comfort and allows the teachers to better care for the children. It is a way to understand the child.
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Jul 18
Marlen A (Jul 18 2022 5:16PM) : These steps are somehow similar to the structure of an effective lesson plan.
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Jul 19
Jennifer V (Jul 19 2022 11:16AM) : Interesting Connecction more

That’s a really interesting connection, Marlen. In what ways do you see the similarities?

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Jul 18
Emily S (Jul 18 2022 6:05PM) : Notice/Wonder more

The exercise of observing a child can be linked to a method I learned for encountering works of fine art, such as a painting. First, one should simply take a substantial amount of time to note what you notice. As that process continues, the mind starts to shift to curiosity… one may wonder, “why did Van Gogh put a big cypress tree in the foreground of Starry Night?” When it comes to observing a child, you might notice the child getting agitated and throwing nearby items at around the same time every day, and then wonder what the reason for that behavior is, and work from there to deduce and address the situation.

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  1. Introductions — facilitator introduces the presenters, the process, the child, and the focusing question (5 minutes)
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    Aug 11
    Lesley T (Aug 11 2020 1:33AM) : What does the focusing question mean?
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    Sep 23
    Aimee Grace E (Sep 23 2020 4:50AM) : I believe it has to do the main idea, the main goal of the whole process. It is almost like a learning target.
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    Jul 24
    Claudia S (Jul 24 2022 9:34AM) : Introductions more

    I agree with your statement. This part of the process helps the facilitators, teachers and others involved to better identify and plan the goal that can better assist the child in his development or in the area of need

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    Jul 18
    Jesse B (Jul 18 2022 5:51PM) : An important question -- what IS the focusing question? [Edited] more

    I read the full document and I still found specific information lacking on what the ‘focusing question’ actually is. It seems like a reasonable assumption to make that either the teacher or the facilitator would need to formulate this question. But again, I don’t think it is specified.

    Perhaps its like the motivation of a lesson plan, where the teacher determines an overarching theme or guiding question that is dealt with throughout the entire discussion.

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    Jul 22
    Lexxis I (Jul 22 2022 3:58PM) : Dependent on the overall goal I think the focusing question could focus on the student's social interactions within the classroom, engagement with the topic or materials, or overall just the objectives/content the teacher wants to be achieved.
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    Jul 22
    Paul A

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    (Jul 22 2022 4:05PM) : The focusing question is something I've often found in dialogue with a facilitator, especially when it's my own work or a student in my classroom who is the focus. more

    I think a focusing question is one that tries to get at what is essential about what you understand about this child, and then, how does this have implications beyond that child to others in your class and to how you are interacting with them. So specific and general, essential and broadly applied. It’s not easy to define.

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    Jul 19
    Jennifer V (Jul 19 2022 11:04AM) : What is a focusing question? more

    I did a little bit more research as I had the same question as others who have read this protocol. What I found is that the focusing question is something you are wondering about the child that you can look at from various perspectives. Here are some examples I found:
    How can I help Jason work more productively with other children in the classroom? (http://essentialschools.org/horace-issues/making-the-whole-student-visible-the-descriptive-review-of-a-child/)
    -Who is Aisha as a student and writer? How can I support her as a writer, particularly on her 12th grade senior thesis? (https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1086/591825)
    -What is behind Cassie’s positive attitude? How can she share her good energy with other students and positively impact her own learning as well as the class community? ("http://teachinglearninggrowing.weebly.com/descriptive-review—child-study.html":http://teachinglearninggrowing.weebly.com/descriptive-review—-child-study.html)

    After reading more, I think the focusing question makes more sense since as the driver behind the confernece.

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    Jul 23
    Christal P (Jul 23 2022 2:22AM) : This helps a lot. I was initially confused about the focusing question. more

    Having the focusing question as the guide behind the conference and the descriptions to be discussed helps create an emphasis to branch off of.

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    Jul 22
    Christal P (Jul 22 2022 4:29PM) : Why is this radical/new? more

    I think this approach, because it is very in-depth and involves many collaborators, can be seen as new and radical since the discussion and the plan for the child will involve people outside of the child’s educational bubble which can be seen as unfavorable for teachers and other professionals.

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    Jul 24
    Claudia S (Jul 24 2022 9:31AM) : Introductions more

    One of the steps that to my understanding is essential when creating this type of process is the introduction. That is because knowing the goal and the people that will be working and providing the services and instruction is key during this process. Also, recognizing the child’s areas of reinforcement, specific information, child’s background, and family participation as well as the tools and what the goal and final outcomes of this process will be about.

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  3. Description of Child — use prompts in notes (20 minutes)
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    Jul 23
    Regina O (Jul 23 2022 10:07PM) : Teacher should be present during the description of the child because he/she spends most of the time with him/her. more

    During the descriptive review of the child, parents, teacher, counselor, psychologist, and any other concern school staff should be present, but teacher is the person trained to observe students behavior that can affect the school or classroom environment while the parents can provide the behavior of the child at home. The other parties may see the child not as frequently. The teacher is very valuable during section 2, describing the child.

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  5. Summary of Presentation, Dominant Themes, Patterns, Restatement of Focusing Question — facilitator (5 minutes)
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  7. Other Descriptions (10 minutes)
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  9. Restatement of Focusing Question (5 minutes)
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    Jul 22
    Alexis A (Jul 22 2022 4:16PM) : In such studies every step is important, but the restatement of the main goal in this case the focusing questions, I think this one stands out a little. because there is no mission accomplished with no clear path, a path that we clearly remember. more

    because there is no mission accomplished with no clear path, a path that we clearly remember. This part of the process is for that, to re-state the path, the focus of the study.

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  11. Clarifying/Probing Questions from participants (15 minutes)
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  13. Pop-ups — What did we hear you say — participants (5 minutes)
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  15. Summary of Presentation, dominant themes, patterns Restatement of Focusing Question — facilitator (5 minutes)
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  17. Discussion/Recommendations — participants (15 minutes)
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    Jul 19
    Jennifer V (Jul 19 2022 11:11AM) : Most valuable step is discussion more

    While I think all of these steps hold much value, I think the most valuable step is the discussion and recommendations. This is the “action” part of the protocol in which a plan is designed that considers the whole child.

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  19. Presenter Response (5 minutes)
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  21. Debrief (5 minutes)
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    Jul 19
    Jennifer V (Jul 19 2022 11:10AM) : Response to Intervention (RtI) [Edited] more

    I can relate this process to the response to intervention process many schools use to support students. In this process, all students participate in screening and interim assessment to check their progress. For those that aren’t performing to the benchmarks, more work is done to understand why and supports are provided. For those students who are not make sufficient progress given targeted supports, a problem-solving committee may convene that examines the student from different perspectives. All stakeholders involved, including the child if they are old enough, should be invited to these meetings. Diagnostic assessments are often performed, along with close evaluation of student work and student characteristics to understand the child more fully. I think that this descriptive child process would actually fit really well as an initial problem-solving meeting! I’m just not sure there would be enough time to conduct this type of meeting with all students who need this level of support.

    Here’s a link to the problem-solving meeting protocol in case you are interested. https://www.interventioncentral.org/sites/default/files/workshop_files/allfiles/Companion_Guide_Tier_3_RTI_Team_Revised.pdf

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Facilitation Tips

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Jun 25
Emily W (Jun 25 2020 3:53PM) : How might you share this protocol AND enact it with your host teacher? What problems might you encounter? How might you respond to criticism of this protocol or its steps?
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Aug 2
Juanita M (Aug 02 2020 6:48PM) : You should share information with your host teacher either before the school day starts or after. A problem that you may encounter with your host teacher is that they may have their own way of accessing their children and may not like the new approach. more
I would respond to criticism by educating the host teacher of the benefits of doing it this way. I find that meeting criticism with facts or research helps people see it differently.
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Aug 3
Aline V (Aug 03 2020 11:53PM) : Protocol more

I agree with you Juanita that one problem could be in the different ways they assessing their students. One suggestion could be to ask the teacher what their methods of assessing are and explaining your reasons for the way you assessed.

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Aug 11
Lesley T (Aug 11 2020 1:19AM) : I agree with Juanita's comment. I would share information with host teacher the morning before or after school. Maybe I can email my host teacher the information or just wait to discuss in the morning.
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Sep 23
Aimee Grace E (Sep 23 2020 5:04AM) : I might share this protocol with my host teacher after i get to know the students better, after asking few questions of why do they approach or do certain things for the students after gathering my data that is when i can approach my host teacher. more

I feel like they are very aware and tends to already do many of these things so if i were to bring to their attention I have to assure i have done research and prove also that this protocol best fit the student. The problem could be like Juanita said is that the host teacher does not want to hear your opinion and believe that how they have been handling things is correct. They also might see our inexperience or the lack of information to persuade the host teacher to apply it.

I would respond to criticism with facts and proofs. I would go beyond the document and find examples where this was applied in the classroom and it was a success. The point is not only to share but to show why it is good, we ourselves have to be sure it works first before handing it to the host teacher and the research and time spend finding extra information not only assist in persuading in term of host teacher criticism but also our own doubt and reservation of the protocol

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Jul 12
Ayaan S (Jul 12 2020 12:08AM) : These are key to making a good environment for the protocol to occur in. Changes may be needed based on any problems or discomfort that the teacher feels the student is feeling.
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Sep 23
Aimee Grace E (Sep 23 2020 5:07AM) : Right, we cannot just come and try to change a system that works. only when something is not working and student discomfort then we offer our help. We also do not want to make our host teacher feel undermined by our way of presenting these protocols.
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  1. Timing — the timing for this process depends on how many people are presenting and how many are participating. 90 minutes allows enough time to work through the process if timed out carefully. Two hours or more is better, especially if a parent is involved.
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  3. Presenters — usually there is one main presenter, most often a teacher with any number of additional interested parties — parents, counselors, other teachers, mentors, etc. who can offer different perspectives on the child. Generally, the more presenters the more time you need for the conference.
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    Jul 18
    Jesse B (Jul 18 2022 6:13PM) : How might you share this protocol AND enact it with your host teacher? What problems might you encounter? How might you respond to criticism of this protocol or its steps? more

    The most straightforward way might be to have the student teacher act as a facilitator while the host teacher takes on the role of the the main presenter. Alternately, the host teacher and the student teacher could both act as presenters, with the host being the main presenter. If the host teacher weren’t comfortable taking the lead as the main presenter, I suppose the student teacher could take on the role and the host teacher could be an auxiliary presenter. Implementing the Descriptive Review has the advantage of being able to use multiple configurations.

    It’s hard to say how one might respond to criticisms of this protocol without knowing what those criticisms are. But I suppose that even without knowing that information, one can see that the flexibility and dynamism of Kelly’s framework provides many ways to handle strong criticism and even disagreement.

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    Jul 22
    Christal P (Jul 22 2022 4:33PM) : I see this as the most valuable aspect of the descriptive review protocol. more

    Involving the child’s entire community as much as possible can be highly effective in improving the educational experience of a student. I think having these outside collaborators (parents, mentors, counselors) can really help educators get a better understanding and profile of the child as these other people in their lives get to see a different side of them and can input on a child’s strengths, weaknesses, and overall temperament.

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  5. Parents as presenters — parents don’t often get a chance to talk to a group of caring, interested people about their child. They know their child well and can add greatly to the conference. There may be times when it is difficult to include them or counter-productive. That is your call as facilitator. That said, once they are involved it’s hard to tell a parent to stop talking so they can be tough to facilitate. Therefore it is important that they are involved in pre-conferencing and are aware of the process before they go into it.
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    Jul 18
    Marlen A (Jul 18 2022 5:18PM) : Parents should be include in the different activities teachers organized about their children.
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    Jul 22
    Regina O (Jul 22 2022 1:16PM) : Parents should be included in the different activities teacher organized about their children, and this only work when parents value their children education. more

    The main challenge of parent being included in their children activities and the contribution to school activities is that many minorities parents are people who for one reason or another became parents when they were very young and never learn the function of being a parent in the society where they live. Few parents hold a different belief about school and teachers to the point that they do not believe in their children wearing uniform, waiting for turn to speak, or following school rules. The school tries every possible way to reach some parents and many times parent block the calls no to be reached. It is a difficult task to get some of these parents on board. Would the inclusion of the parent have any effect if the parents do not get involved. I worked in a school where there were many challenging students, and the % of parents presence at the parent’s meeting was always very low.

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    Jul 18
    Marlen A (Jul 18 2022 5:19PM) : Some parents know their children's routines, likes, dislikes better than other people.
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    Jul 18
    Emily S (Jul 18 2022 6:11PM) : Absolutely, but even very young children can code-switch, or behave differently when their parent is not around. I agree that in most cases, the parent has the best understanding of their child as a whole, but they're still missing part of the day.
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    Jul 19
    Jennifer V (Jul 19 2022 10:49AM) : Focus on parents more

    I love this focus on including parents in the dialogue. As a literacy coach, I found that teachers often blame parents for “not reading enough” with their child at home or “not doing their homework”, etc. Yet, they really don’t give the parents the opportunity to be active partners in their child’s education within the confines of what the parents are able to do. What I mean by that is that teachers often don’t take the time to understand the context of the child’s home life and work with the parents to find ways to enrich their child’s education at home. It could be that parents don’t attend conferences because of their work schedule, etc. I love how this protocol includes parents as a main stakeholder from the get-go.

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    Jul 28
    Bradly R (Jul 28 2022 8:36PM) : How can we as future parents use the HOM that we've learned to become better communicators...I think that parent's are naturally very tunnel-minded when it comes to their children and think they have all the answers.What discussions can we engage?
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    Jul 22
    Lexxis I (Jul 22 2022 4:03PM) : Students are very aware of their surroundings and their own learning, they just need a foundation on how to express it.
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    Aug 2
    Khurram A (Aug 02 2021 4:45PM) : This is an interesting point, parents might show bias that might be counter productive to their education.
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    Jul 23
    Christal P (Jul 23 2022 2:18AM) : I agree with this take. more

    I think one of the criticisms of this protocol is the involvement of the parents. It can be difficult to manage the meetings and discussions, however, it is essential to figure out how to involve them to help plan out the child’s academic success.

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    Jul 28
    Bradly R (Jul 28 2022 8:38PM) : Agree entirely. Bias in the sense that parent's may think they have their child entirely "figured out." I've seen it happen when tutoring and it's difficult to reach through to parents in this state of mind.
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    Aug 2
    mirseda K (Aug 02 2021 4:51PM) : Teachers need to talk more often with student's parents. more
    This is one of the important parts that I missed when I was a student. As a future teacher, the connection with my student’s parents is an important key in education. One thing that I want to work with my host teacher is that relationship and creating an environment to be able to let parents be able to talk with us about their child.
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    Aug 13
    Maritza M (Aug 13 2021 10:49PM) : I agree! [Edited] more

    Getting to know your student’s means getting to know their parents. Parents are the best resource there is when trying to get to know your student’s. Nobody knows a child better than their parents.

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    Jul 22
    Lexxis I (Jul 22 2022 4:02PM) : I believe teachers make a great effort to do so however there is not enough dedicated paid time for them to do so. In addition, parent engagement is extremely low due to numerous of factors
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    Aug 12
    Laura D (Aug 12 2021 9:49PM) : Parents' participation is an important key for their child's success. more

    When parents are involved in their child’s education, this makes a big difference. Therefore, when I have the opportunity to be in a classroom, I will work with the parents to establish a good relationship with them.

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  7. Pre-conference — pre-conferencing far enough in advance of the conference allows the presenters important time to reflect on the child, collect information and prepare for their presentation.
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  9. Summarizing — facilitator should take careful notes and pay attention to any dominant themes or patterns that emerge, while keeping the group’s attention fixed on the focusing question.
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Notes on Process

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  1. Introductions — facilitator introduces the presenters, the process, the child, and the focusing question. In introducing the child, the facilitator may want, at this time, to give a thumbnail description of the child: grade, age, birth order, pseudonym if appropriate.
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    Aug 2
    Khurram A (Aug 02 2021 4:47PM) : This might be quite important especially in these times. Students have different needs that are also affected by the identities they belong to.

  1. Description of Child — The presenting teacher may describe the classroom context if it would be helpful to participants: the room plan, setting, schedule, etc. Then she describes the child, including both characteristic and unusual behavior, using the prompts in the following categories:
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    I’m the Tech Liaison for the New York City Writing Project. I… (more)

    Jun 29
    Paul A

    I’m the Tech Liaison for the New York City Writing Project. I… (more)

    (Jun 29 2020 2:36PM) : Use the notes under "Description of Child" (paragraphs 26-30) to guide your writing about a youth or a child you know well.
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    Aug 13
    Maritza M (Aug 13 2021 10:59PM) : In one of my education courses, I was required to write a case study on a student and in the case study we had to include a description of what the educational setting of this child looked like. I [Edited]
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    Jul 12
    Ayaan S (Jul 12 2020 12:17AM) : What are usual behaviors and characteristics defined by? Each child has a different background that they come from, some things are normal for a child that may not be seen in another.
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    Jul 31
    Ifeoma E (Jul 31 2020 3:33PM) : knowing the student's background is at the core of how to manage a class to create a conducive learning environment. Acknowledging the importance of difference in the classroom is particularly essential to help avoid biases that can lead to assumptions
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    Sep 23
    Aimee Grace E (Sep 23 2020 5:10AM) : I could not agree more. Well said. There are things that might apply to one students while it might not work on another student.
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    Aug 2
    Khurram A (Aug 02 2021 4:48PM) : That is true but their might be some behaviors that are "unusual" regardless of ones identity, it is good to acknowledge those but i also agree even in this case one should be mindful of the students background.
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    Aug 12
    Laura D (Aug 12 2021 9:59PM) : I also would have liked to know more what they meant by usual behaviors. I believe we have to be mindful when it come to children's background.
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    Jul 7
    Andrea C (Jul 07 2020 1:41PM) : That this child needs more help. more

    Are you saying every child with an unusual behavior is bad ?

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    Aug 11
    Lesley T (Aug 11 2020 1:22AM) : I don't think they are suggesting that unusual behavior is bad. The article was written in 1996 so the vocabulary might be different. Just like how mental health disorders are taught in a class called "abnormal psychology"
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    Jul 18
    Emily S (Jul 18 2022 6:13PM) : Children who are "gifted" or are working at a level of greater mastery than their peers are not challenged and can easily get bored. This boredom can lead to some behavior that may have a child labelled as "bad," when, really, they need more engagement.
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    Jul 23
    Karyn F (Jul 23 2022 10:32PM) : I definetly agree with you. I know many people who felt like school wasn't challenging or engaging enough and some felt it wasn't even worth the time or energy.
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    Jul 23
    Karyn F (Jul 23 2022 1:48PM) : Take a walk more

    I once observed a teacher allow a student to just go take a walk mid lesson. When I asked why he told him the student always makes a scene in his other classes and allowing him to take a walk he comes back calmer, focused, and has better behavior. He said the other teachers make it worse when they scold him and spend most of thier period trying to correct his behavior.

  1. Physical Presence and Gesture — Characteristic gestures and expressions: How are these visible in the child’s face, hands, body attitudes? How do they vary, and in response to what circumstances (e.g. indoors and outdoors)? Characteristic level of energy: How would you describe the child’s rhythm and pace? How does it vary? How would you describe the child’s voice? It’s rhythm, expressiveness, inflection? Disposition. How would you describe the child’s characteristic temperament and its range (e.g. intense, even, up and down)? How are feelings expressed? Fully? Rarely? How do you “read” the child’s feelings? Where and how are they visible? What is the child’s emotional tone or “color” (e.g. vivid, bright, serene, etc.) ?
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    Aug 1
    Ifeoma E (Aug 01 2020 4:05AM) : Visualizing these characteristics goes beyond knowing the information on their permanent record. It entails genuine interest in their background and experiences. Developing an appropriate relationship is central to be able to understand them at this level [Edited]
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    Aug 5
    Emmie S (Aug 05 2020 11:06PM) : I believe that before making concrete opinions on a child's physical presence you must also understand their background and the bases for what they are working with as all family dynamics are different.
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    Aug 27
    Zedica D (Aug 27 2020 2:05PM) : Physical presence and gesture more

    When the child gets angry he often crosses his arms or throws himself on the floor. When he is outdoors he runs away or around the playground. He screams or talks very loud. Feelings are expressed fully. When he is happy he is laughing and smiling, when he is upset he is screaming or crying. Feelings are visible in tone, actions, and body language.

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    Aug 2
    Elijah H (Aug 02 2021 4:39PM) : physical presence and gesture more

    I believe making deep observations based on the students gestures and presence in the classroom can be helpful when trying to understand the student as a person. This may gave indications to the teacher on the students enthusiasm or look of, in the class, as well as their understanding or comfort in the particular setting. Body language can help one learn what is on the students mind that they are not verbally sharing.

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    Sep 6
    Aniya M (Sep 06 2021 8:45AM) : Understanding the Physical Traits more

    Having an understanding of how the student choose to exhibit their feelings through action, gesture and sound are greatly important as they set the baseline for behaviors that are typically for the student versus those that demonstrate some level of distress. Additionally, this information is essential to share with the students’ future educators to both get to know the students as well as record any progress or regress that the student is demonstrating.

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    Jul 18
    Harriet F (Jul 18 2022 5:31PM) : Do early childhood educators naturally take into account non-verbal communication? more

    Do secondary and post-secondary educators have much to learn from early childhood educators? How do we take into account physical presence and gestures in an online environment?

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    Jul 18
    Crystal S (Jul 18 2022 5:52PM) : Physical Presence and Gestures- While doing an observation for my previous class, I remember this was one of the areas I had to describe. more
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    Jul 30
    Jessica C (Jul 30 2020 3:52PM) : I've never thought to pay attention to this level of physical detail in a student, but I can see how it could be helpful have concrete observations rather than just interpretations of behavior.
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    Aug 11
    Lesley T (Aug 11 2020 1:26AM) : Same here! I really like how descriptive and specific the definition of physical presence & gesture is. It gives a clear explanation of what we should be looking for
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    Sep 14
    Aimee Grace E (Sep 14 2020 3:17PM) : yes very much so
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    Jul 28
    Bradly R (Jul 28 2022 8:31PM) : I was tutoring virtually during the pandemic, many different topics, and it bothered me that I wasn't able to see faces. You can tell a lot about a person's sub-conscious thoughts in the way that they express their understanding of ideas and new knowledge
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    Sep 14
    Aimee Grace E (Sep 14 2020 3:16PM) : In the small period of time i have observed classrooms i have noticed that a lot can be tell by the posture and expression on a student's face. I have noticed a child who tends to put their hand on their face and slouch on their desk tends to mean they more

    are bored in the lecture. A child who tends to play with the items on their desk while the teacher is lecturing shows that they barely have interest in the lecture. I have also experienced where a child is looking forward and paying attention to the teacher’s talk and movement, they are either very interested or trying their best to comprehend.

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    Jul 23
    Regina O (Jul 23 2022 10:21PM) : Aimee, a teacher can only observe and write the actions or behavior of the child for the specialist to determine the reason of the action. more

    The teacher can not become an evaluator determining why the child acts in certain ways. I remember telling my supervisor that a girl needed to be in a special education settings to which she responded asking me " are you an evaluator?" Since that time, I learned my lesson.

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    Aug 2
    Khurram A (Aug 02 2021 4:51PM) : This is also a tough thing to consider, because behaviors that are different than a teachers norms are sometimes associated with being "bad", but a child who might be overly energetic might just need to be catered to a different learning environment. more

    Just a lot to always consider.

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    Aug 12
    Laura D (Aug 12 2021 10:09PM) : Characteristic gestures and expressions could say a lot about a child. But, we need to be very careful the way we interpret these physical presences because a classroom is very diverse, and culture could influence these characteristics.
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    Jul 18
    Emily S (Jul 18 2022 5:56PM) : Thinking like an anthropologist more

    I like how Carini’s protocol is so rooted in what is observable, not in labels.

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    Sep 14
    Aimee Grace E (Sep 14 2020 3:19PM) : These are many questions that we have to really keep in my mind to assure we are really paying attention and working on managing characteristic that shows lack of interest. Through this observation one can tell what they can use and what not to too.
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  3. Relationships with Children and Adults — Does the child have friends? How would you characterize those attachments? Are they consistent? Changeable? Is the child recognized within the group? How is this recognition expressed? Is the child comfortable in the group? How would you describe the child’s casual, day-to-day contact with others? How does this daily contact vary? When there are tensions, how do they get resolved? How would you describe the child’s relationship to you? To other adults?
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    Aug 27
    Zedica D (Aug 27 2020 2:09PM) : Relationships with children and adults more

    The child has friends that are changeable. He is recognized by name and he is invited to join games and activities. He is comfortable in the group but sometimes prefers to play alone. Tensions get resolved by using words or finding a different activity for the moment then returning to the previous activity. He has a great relationship with me

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    Aug 2
    Elijah H (Aug 02 2021 4:45PM) : relationships with children and adults more

    I think this is something that is very overlooked in a class setting and often underestimated. Understanding your students social skills, and whether their skills hinder or enhance their learning experience is important. I believe this will also help to create lessons that include more engagement to help the students learn to work collaboratively and engage with others as a part of their learning. Through observation, you can also attempt to understand why the student is able to or unable to build on relationships in class and ultimately work with parents to better support the students, with additional info.

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    Aug 13
    Maritza M (Aug 13 2021 11:08PM) : Social Skills more

    I was amazed by these questions. Because my time observing in schools was so limited due to different areas I had to focus on getting information on, I never got the chance to pay close attention whether the child belong to a specific group or had a preference being around certain people. This something I will definitely consider during my future observations.

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    Aug 5
    Rafael P (Aug 05 2022 6:21PM) : Theoretical framework and Culturally responsive pedagogy. more

    I too will consider using this in the future. I really found this method to understand the student to better serve them their academic, social, or physical needs to be supportive and empowering. Parent and student involvement in conversations concerning the child, are pushed out when proper services like facilitation or multilingual services are not present at meetings. As a theoretical framework I wonder how its implementation can look like in person. I am eager to see of the possibilities of incorporating even in my pedagogy. I say this because bridging that knowledge into the lesson planning is an effective culturally responsive practice.

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    Sep 6
    Aniya M (Sep 06 2021 8:47AM) : Relationships [Edited] more

    While many times we focus solely on the work that we have students complete and their ability to do so effectively, we should also keep an eye out for the way our students interact with others socially. Such would require us to consider the manner in which students communicate, problem solving and engage with both their peers and adults.

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    Jul 23
    Regina O (Jul 23 2022 10:44PM) : Aniya, you are correct with you comment about the importance of relationship of the child with others. more

    Some students are very social with some teachers and not with others. I noticed that clean and well dressed students are treated different than the others who look different. Students tend to like and be more sociable with teachers who are not very academic demanding, sometimes.

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    Jul 22
    Lexxis I (Jul 22 2022 4:16PM) : This seems to be the most valuable step in ensuring that teachers attend to students with respect and care. more

    This can tell you what are the student’s limits, level of comfort, and behaviors. This creates a relationship of respect and awareness every teacher needs to have with their students

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    Aug 6
    Rafael P (Aug 06 2022 10:17AM) : Peer groups influence students by learned set norms and values that govern and reinforce their existence. It is important for teachers to pay attention to the peer groups students are associated with. more

    The peer group for students play a huge role in the developmental psychology of a child. Peer groups influence students by learned set norms and values that govern and reinforce their existence. It is important for teachers to pay attention to the peer groups students are associated with. By shaping and controlling behaviors, public institutions like schools, serve as a reference to their inaccessibility to life determining skills to live with dignity. Therefore, teachers, by moving among the people as a fish swims in the sea, lessons are gained from parents, students peers, and the community, that can be used to better serve students’ academic, social, psychological and physical needs

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    Sep 14
    Aimee Grace E (Sep 14 2020 3:37PM) : The child has friends, he is very much liked and even followed by his peers. He is consistent with the same group he hangs with so are they. The child seems very comfortable and very at ease to express themselves freely. more
    He has short conversation with other peers but they are very short and tends to be more about school rather than his hobby and interest. He talks about those with specific people he feels he got to know and understand him. When there are tension it gets to be resolved through mediation, he tends to speak to an adult before confronting the other person and i am one of those people he enjoys talking to about it. He is very friendly and respectful to other adults and tends to do what is asked of him unless he does not understand the task at hand, that when you see him slacking off.
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    Jul 23
    Karyn F (Jul 23 2022 1:58PM) : Seat assignments more

    Even if a classroom doesnt have seat assignments typically students like to sit in the same seat. I was observing a classroom where this boy was sitting and a girl came and asked him why are you even sitting here I don’t want you sitting here. The boy doesn’t look at her but says because I can and then ignores her after she continues. The girl then asks the people around her and makes a bigger scene of the issue. The teacher looks over and ignores the issue. The teacher after class tells me shes always causing a scene and it wasn’t even worth it to acknowledge her. I felt bad for the boy who had to sit next to her and felt that by not acknowledging the girl it was worse for both parties.

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    Aug 14
    mirseda K (Aug 14 2021 7:47AM) : children adult relationship more

    I think those questions are very good ones to keep in my mind while interacting with my studnets. Students need to be described based also on their relationship with adults. When we are able to give answer to those question, we re more prepared to create trust relationship with our children.

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    Jul 30
    Jessica C (Jul 30 2020 3:54PM) : If teachers primarily see their students in the context of their own class, how do they get a read of what students' relationships are with other adults?
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    Aug 1
    Ifeoma E (Aug 01 2020 4:35AM) : I don't think a student's relationship assessment can be done in isolation, interaction with parents and other staff members who are directly involved with the child can help the teacher understand the child's relationship with adults better
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    Aug 3
    Aline V (Aug 03 2020 11:50PM) : Adults more

    Perhaps they are alluding to all the other staff members that students interact with briefly throughout the day. For example, the lunch lady or when they are transitioning to other classrooms and there is an interaction with the gym or art or music teacher. Sometimes there are staff members who come into the classroom and visit. During these brief encounters, were it to happen a few times, there may be behavior that is reasonable to be noted and not dismissed.

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    Aug 11
    Lesley T (Aug 11 2020 1:29AM) : Aline, I think you gave really good examples of different forms on interactions the student might have with other adults.
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    Aug 11
    Lesley T (Aug 11 2020 1:28AM) : Students interact with different teachers all day. Especially depending on their grade. This is where it would be helpful to have conversation with other teachers to share and compare notes about the student's relationships with other children and adults
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    Sep 14
    Aimee Grace E (Sep 14 2020 3:40PM) : Other Adults more

    One of the thing the teacher can do they can talk to other adults the child tends to socialize or is involved in their classroom. The teacher can also ask about their work and behavior to those teachers. I know what you are talking about. It can be hard keeping track of all students and their socialization with other peers and staffs.

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  5. Activities and Interests — What are the child’s preferred activities? Do these reflect underlying interests that are visible to you? For example, does drawing or story writing center on recurrent and related motifs such as superhuman figures, danger and rescue, volcanoes and other large-scale events? How would you describe the range of the child’s interests? Which interests are intense, passionate? How would you characterize the child’s engagement with projects (e.g. quick, methodical, slapdash, thorough)? Is the product important to the child? What is the response to mishaps, frustrations? Are there media that have a strong appeal for the child (e.g. paint, blocks, books, woodworking)?
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    Aug 27
    Zedica D (Aug 27 2020 2:15PM) : activities and interests more

    He loves to read and be read to. He also enjoys looking at maps and other places in the world. When he draws he usually tries to draw another continent because of his love for maps. He is very passionate about this interest. The child completes projects thoroughly and takes pride in his creations and work. He needs to start over if he makes a visible mistake.

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    Aug 13
    Maritza M (Aug 13 2021 11:16PM) : Rich Learning Environment more

    This is one thing I will share with my host teacher. It is important to provide children with a rich classroom environment. This means that children will be exposed to a variety of centers making it possible for them to participate in many different activities. This will allow the teacher to see what activities interest the child and what activities they demonstrate a lack of interest.

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    Jul 18
    Diana L (Jul 18 2022 7:53PM) : Activities that Engage more

    Children more often then not look for activities they can relate with and enjoy while learning. Therefore, I agree with you Maritza that having a host teacher to see this is important. Having students perform activities not only make is engaging but it also allows us to assess students and see what works well and what doesn’t.

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    Jul 18
    Marlen A (Jul 18 2022 5:27PM) : Teachers must consider the activities children enjoy and which are their interests. When educators focus their class on that, children can be easily engaged in the classroom activities.
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  7. Formal Learning — What is the child’s characteristic approach to a new subject or process or direction? In learning, what does the child rely on (e.g. observation, memory, trial and error, steps and sequence, getting the whole picture, context)? How does that learning approach vary from subject to subject? What is the child’s characteristic attitude toward learning? How would you characterize the child as a thinker? What ideas and content have appeal? Is there a speculative streak? A problem-solving one? A gift for analogy and metaphor? For image? For reason and logic? For insight? For intuition? For the imaginative leap? For fantasy? What are the child’s preferred subjects? What conventions and skills come easily? Which are hard?
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    Aug 11
    Lesley T (Aug 11 2020 1:32AM) : This topic focus on what type learner the student is and how they approach learning. It is important to know students' approach because you can help incorporate their approach into lesson plans.
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    Aug 27
    Zedica D (Aug 27 2020 2:26PM) : formal learning more

    He is interested in learning new things and gaining new skills. He relies on observation as well as steps and sequence. During math he focuses more on the steps and sequence, versus art where he observes more on technique. He is very strong with problem-solving and thinking reasonably and logically.

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    Aug 28
    Jessica A (Aug 28 2020 9:44PM) : Formal Learning more

    I love how specific these questions are. I never would have thought to consider questions like; “How would you characterize the child as a thinker? What ideas and content have appeal?”Is there a speculative streak? A problem-solving one? A gift for analogy and metaphor? For image?" Thes are crucial questions that, when answered honestly- give us a plethora of important information about our students.

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    Sep 6
    Aniya M (Sep 06 2021 8:51AM) : Learning About Students as Learners more

    The more we know each student as a learner, the more equipt we become to engage in instruction that is sensative to their needs and appealing to their interests. Moreover, we are able to tailor meaningful learning experiences that students are eager to participate in.

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    Jul 18
    Marlen A (Jul 18 2022 5:23PM) : While reading all there steps, I remember about the IEP (Individualized Education Plan)
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    Jul 18
    Crystal S (Jul 18 2022 5:45PM) : Formal learning more

    These are good questions to discover the child’s learning style and interests to incorporate them into the lessons.

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    Jul 22
    Christal P (Jul 22 2022 4:37PM) : Understanding and planning for a child's formal learning experience requires a whole-child approach. more

    I think I can present this protocol to a host teacher by focusing on the benefits and the aspect of involving a child’s community in their learning. It is a heavier and more demanding protocol, however, it focuses on the whole-child and allows for a deeper understanding of the student and for more easily implemented preventative measures.

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    Jul 23
    Karyn F (Jul 23 2022 2:38PM) : Knowing the whole child more

    I think when reading the protocol it seems a bit intensive because of all the little details in the description of the child. However, as an educator you should be getting to know your students on a deeper level and be able to have a mental note on many of the questions you could ask. Also, other participants involved with the child can contribute some responses. Maybe a student doesn’t necessarily gravite to you but knows staff or another teacher that share the same interests and gravitated towards them.

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    Jul 30
    Jessica C (Jul 30 2020 3:58PM) : These are helpful categories
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    Aug 14
    mirseda K (Aug 14 2021 7:52AM) : subjects more

    having the opportunity to work with STEM schools, students have different learning processes is based on the subjects. WE need to know our student’s learning process and which of the approaches we need to implement to better serve them.

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    Jul 18
    Diana L (Jul 18 2022 7:56PM) : I couldn't agree more, being part of LUTE-STEM in the schools we are placed we will have the ability to see first hand the different approaches that could be used. more

    Every student is different and it is up to us educators to rule the best learning approach for them to be successful.

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  1. Summary of Presentation, dominant themes, patterns, Restatement of Focusing Question – facilitator
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  3. Other Descriptions — This should not be a repetition of the description already given but observations that build on it and furthers our insight into the child. It may include comments from people not present. If a parent is not present any important medical information supplied by the school or doctors should be presented at this time along with any other school documents or reports.
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    Aug 5
    Rafael P (Aug 05 2022 6:41PM) : Teacher-Parent-Community-School Front more

    For public school teachers, the relationships and rapport established with students and parents, along with strong wraparound services provided by the school, and partnered with community resources and organizations; essentially a mutual aid, dual power political organization, is an effective model to follow. Children and people discover who they are and what they are from the ways in which they have been treated by others who surround them in the process of growing up.
    However, in the reading I notice a lack of emphasis of the community where the child and school community reside. The child’s socioeconomic conditions determining and influencing consciousness development, is an important aspect of a child’s life that deserves uncovering. Not in isolation, are a child’s relationships with other people that form their kinship. Teachers and staff must take into account heavily.

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  5. Restatement of Focusing Question — It is important to keep the group focused on the purpose of the conference.
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    Aug 19
    Scott C (Aug 19 2020 9:49AM) : When I have observed other classes, I found that this step has been essential in preparing kids. Repetition has a ton of value in the classroom!
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    Aug 1
    Branden G (Aug 01 2022 2:12PM) : Remember why we are here more

    It is important to remember that we are there to help the child. If a topic comes up, especially with a parent or guardian present, we should touch on the topic, but keep in mind the main reason we are there so that we will not get distracted and we will get to the proper solution

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  7. Clarifying/Probing Questions from participants — These are burning questions — ones that participants feel they must have an answer to in order to go further. This opens out multiple perspectives and generates new information that may enhance the teacher’s insights, expectations, or approach, or may even shift her focusing question itself. Start with clarifying and move to probing questions.
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    Aug 3
    Aline V (Aug 03 2020 11:45PM) : Burning Questions more

    This is a time for the other side to chime in and ask questions they need answered before taking the next step. With that being said, this is a vital step in this process as these questions could define how things can go.

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    Aug 11
    Lesley T (Aug 11 2020 1:35AM) : I think it is important to include multiple perspectives. This way you either have the same information or you have new information and then you decide how to tackle the new information and how to understand it.
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    Aug 19
    Scott C (Aug 19 2020 9:51AM) : Definitely agree with this - multiple perspectives are important for a variety of reasons. Every kid learns differently.
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    Jul 18
    Emily S (Jul 18 2022 5:59PM) : It's unlikely that any one person has the full picture. more

    People, even and maybe especially children, are complex creatures! We need to accept that there may be complimentary or competing information about an individual being studied, and not to assume that the manner in which a child behaves in one scenario is how they behave in all scenarios.

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    Jul 23
    Karyn F (Jul 23 2022 3:02PM) : Multiple perspectives more

    Maybe a teacher is unaware of a teaching style that another teacher has implemented that works better for the student or has worked for students with the same characteristics. Maybe the teacher is interpreting the child actions in the wrong way. When working with colleagues, and parent a collaborative effort is going to give you the best information to help the child better meet thier academic, social, emotional needs.

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    Jul 25
    Stephanie M (Jul 25 2022 10:37AM) : Multiple teaching styles [Edited] more

    I agreed with you Karyn,
    Working in collaboration with different teachers are essential in the learning process of the teacher and the students. maybe the other teacher went to some workshop and she is knows how to deal with a child with more severe needs. Moreover, Teacher collaboration is key, in order to teach successfully.

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  9. Pop-ups – What did we hear you say — The participants take turns making simple statements from their notes about what they have heard about the child.
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  11. Summary of Presentation, dominant themes, patterns, Restatement of Focusing Question.
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  13. Discussion/Recommendations — participants discuss what they have heard and offer suggestions and recommendations. They may build on each other or contradict each other. These recommendations focus on ways to support the child’s strengths – not change the child – and create harmony in her school life.
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    Aug 11
    Lesley T (Aug 11 2020 1:36AM) : Some participants might have different suggestions and recommendations. They should all be discussed and evaluated to help create harmony in the student's school life.
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    Aug 28
    Jessica A (Aug 28 2020 9:49PM) : Support the Child's strengths-- not change the child. more

    How do we deal with parents that want to change their child completely- instead of building on that child’s strengths?

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  15. Presenter Response — the presenter may choose to comment on anything she has heard, answer any question that has come up or give any new insights she has gained. She is not obliged to do any of these.
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    Aug 19
    Scott C (Aug 19 2020 9:48AM) : Response and how the instructor or presenter responds is important I'm that it can set the tone.
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  17. Debrief — How did this process work for the presenter(s) in gaining new insights about the child? How was it for the participants? What implications emerged for their own practice. The facilitator should be given feedback at this time.
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    Aug 2
    Nile G (Aug 02 2021 4:34PM) : Debrief — How did this process work for the presenter(s) in gaining new insights about the child? How was it for the participants? What implications emerged for their own practice. The facilitator should be given feedback at this time.
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Protocols are most powerful and effective when used within an ongoing professional learning community and facilitated by a skilled facilitator. To learn more about professional learning communities and seminars for facilitation, please visit the School Reform Initiative website at www.schoolreforminitiative.org

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DMU Timestamp: May 11, 2020 21:16

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Jun 25
Emily W (Jun 25 2020 3:55PM) : Can you think of a time in which this protocol might have been useful or necessary in building stronger student-teacher relationships and decreasing any negative misconceptions?
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Jul 29
Amanda G (Jul 29 2020 11:36PM) : During a power struggle. This protocol would be helpful. Understanding the child's relationships with children and other adults may help the teacher build a relationship with the student while decreasing misconceptions of why it has happened.
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Jul 23
Regina O (Jul 23 2022 10:37PM) : The protocol is used before a child is declared a candidate to receive some forms of special services. more

During this time all people involved in the child education and care come together to present the student behavior to find out if there are behaviors that need to changed or eliminated because they affect the child, and others.

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Sep 14
Aimee Grace E (Sep 14 2020 3:46PM) : Protocol more

I believe it is necessary from day one for the teacher to try to set up a similar protocol. Students like it when teachers are straight forward with their expectation and when students are involved and the teacher gets to know more about their students it creates an atmosphere of openness and respect. This can eliminate many misconception from the starts. Teacher have to understand and implement strategies that focuses on the students more than themselves.

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Jul 23
Regina O (Jul 23 2022 10:29PM) : Aimee, the use of protocols is very effective, but it is timed. I agree with you that teacher should use protocols with the students. more

Many teachers use a protocol they name routine, or any other name. But the use of it, takes time for children to learn and I am not sure if the school principals would be flexible with changing the way they operate the school.

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Jul 12
Ayaan S (Jul 12 2020 12:21AM) : Maybe putting examples in this protocol from when it was used would allow a better understanding of it. It would provide ideas for those thinking to implement it and perhaps encourage others who are uncertain.
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Aug 14
mirseda K (Aug 14 2021 7:53AM) : agree more

I totally agree. Sometimes as teachers we read some protocols but having example it helps us to better understand cases.

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Jul 22
Karyn F (Jul 22 2022 4:14PM) : A better understanding of your students more

The first thing that comes to mind when going through this protocol is Holistic teaching. Understanding the whole student to be able to provide them with tools and strategies they can use to empower their learning. The protocol gives parents, teachers, and others the opportunity to share their perspectives on the student to work together to strengthen the student’s abilities.

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Jul 23
Karyn F (Jul 23 2022 9:54PM) : Inclusive schools more

When reading over the protocol it reminds me a lot of the inclusion of students with special needs. This is because when getting to know your student better you have to take into consideration social, emotional, and or physical needs. When you understand these needs you can make the necessary adjustments so that every student can succeed. For students with special needs you take into consideration those same needs.

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