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Mar 5

They feel like fighting in the military is fighting against their people and helping their enemies.

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Mar 5

Yes, this is important to release all the Black people who were accused of something and going to jail for that. However, what about the people who actually committed a crime, In the text it says that all the Black people should be released from Jails. What about the people who have actually done a crime, there will always be criminals from every race, so saying that “All Black people should be released from the many jails” is both a good and somewhat of a bad thing.

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Mar 5

It looks like the racist government is trying to hide black people’s history just like how they are doing with the history of Muslims.

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Mar 5

This means that Black community wants to have good houses to live.

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Mar 5

I think this means that people had back than had a hard time getting full employment.

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Mar 5

This reminds me of when Pakistan became a nation and millions of innocent people were killed when they moved to Pakistan.

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Mar 5

When black people are forced to fight in the military to defend the racist government. It’s like they are fighting the enemy with the enemy.

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Mar 5

This makes me think that a lot of people were arrested by an unfair reason, because all they wanted to do was to be free, existing and not causing any harm to anyone, but for white people or racist people this was a sin made from Black people. White thought that Black people didn’t deserved to live, so they want to put every single African American in jail.

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Mar 5

This made me think of all the homeless people that live in the streets,and doesn’t have a house to live in.

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Mar 5

This connects to me because I always have big ideas that has a low chance of succeeding. For example I always wanted to stop all the factories from emitting C02, it probably won’t happen since it would take a lot of money and, resources. Going back to the paragraph it would take a lot of money to make all Black people own guns who can’t afford them.

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Mar 5

This reminds me of how the police treated the Black people in the movie Selma, this movie is about the events that happened in Selma obviously, but it also shows how MLK was fighting the White supremacy.

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Mar 5

The phrase #7 stood out to me because police brutality hasn’t stopped and we are still fighting so things can change. I have seen how police abuse of their power against other, how they kill people saying that “they were suspect” only because of their appearance or for any other minimum reason.

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Mar 5

While going largely ignored, Skloot makes it clear that some members of this scientific community were willing to take Gartler’s findings seriously, and conducted themselves accordingly. This is foreshadowing on Skloot’s part, because it would seem as though these genetic tests that would lead them to Henrietta’s family will become important in time.

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Mar 5

Yet again, these learned men of science seem more invested in the race of the donor than in the conducting of their research. While this should again come as no surprise, Skloot’s inclusion of this detail makes their priorities clear.

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Mar 5

Skloot is deliberate in her explanation of the HeLa contamination debacle. She does not make the scientists look like fools, nor does she minimize the issue; rather, she is systematic in her explanation, because an oversight of this kind had never even occurred before. But she is also deliberate in her description of how big a deal this contamination was; years of research and millions of dollars effectively wasted.

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Mar 5

It should come as no surprise, but in the sixties, and even today to a certain degree, racism pervaded every level of medicine and medical study. While the race of donor may have some small degree of affect on the sample, a mere cell culture should be unaffected.

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Mar 5

- yellow highlights: the main issues that are brought up/trying to be solved.
green highlights: solutions to said issues.
brown highlights: nuances in the solutions and or issues, because this is a multifaceted discussion.

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Mar 5

It may also be in part because some of these shows often don’t invest in their women characters, focusing intently on male relationships. All the while throwing random women with no development into the plot to make a point of how they are straight, even if the characters have less chemistry with them than they do with their fellow male characters.

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Mar 5

In this chapter, Skloot is finally able to talk to some members of the Lacks family. First, she meets Sonny who warns her of the family’s walls built up against people like her who are trying to learn about their mother. Sonny then brings her to Lawrence who talks to her for a while before deciding that it would be ok for the rest of the family to talk with her. When Skloot is talking with Lawrence, she finds that he doesn’t know a lot about HeLa cells. He knows that they came from his mother’s cancer and are used in science, but he doesn’t know what a cell is or how the cells are being used to help science.

Sonny returns to Lawrence’s house with Day. They all sit down and encourage Day to share Henrietta’s story. He has done this many times before, so he skips to the cancer and gives the same informational spiel he had given to many reporters before. It is when he starts to talk about the lack of information he received that the whole family digresses into a conversation on the illegal and immoral use of unknowing Black people in medical trials. We hear some of the stories and legends that the Lacks kids grew up with. We also hear about some of the real-life horror stories that come from these trials at Johns Hopkins.

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